Yahoo Buys Start-Up Distill for Its Mobile-Ad Talent

Yahoo has purchased a start-up that developed a collaborative video-based system targeted at hiring technical talent. But instead of utilizing that unique approach for vetting engineers, the venerable Internet giant will be shutting down the company and hiring its top engineers for mobile ad development.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The start-up, called Distill, had secured $1.3 million in investment about five months back, and had designed and created a system in which a possible hire, such as an engineer, was interviewed through a Skype-like video conversation that also included programming challenges occurring during the interview.

If the prospective employee was, say, a graphic designer, the interview could include a collaborative walk-through and discussion of a portfolio. User names did not have to be exchanged, since an interview could be scheduled online and a link sent to the prospect. With Skype, for instance, the prospect would have the interviewer's user name after the interview, and vice versa.

Tapjoy's History

Marissa Mayer, the Yahoo CEO, has said on several occasions that the company receives 12,000 resumes a week from people interested in working there.

The engineers behind Distill had also been part of the original team that created Tapjoy, a performance-based mobile advertising platform. Tapjoy encouraged mobile device users to watch an ad or download an app in exchange for rewards.

Tapjoy's history includes some controversy. It had been criticized for offering allegedly "free" services that later charged monthly fees on credit cards. However, Tapjoy has now reportedly cleaned up its act, and says it reaches about 450 million mobile users monthly.

A Distill co-founder, Deng-Kai Chen, has described himself in his LinkedIn profile as having been Tapjoy's third employee. Co-founder Ken MacInnis was at StumbleUpon, and later at Yahoo. In all, seven of Distill's employees are moving to Yahoo, including others who also...

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Yahoo Buys Start-Up Distill for Its Mobile-Ad Talent

Yahoo has purchased a start-up that developed a collaborative video-based system targeted at hiring technical talent. But instead of utilizing that unique approach for vetting engineers, the venerable Internet giant will be shutting down the company and hiring its top engineers for mobile ad development.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The start-up, called Distill, had secured $1.3 million in investment about five months back, and had designed and created a system in which a possible hire, such as an engineer, was interviewed through a Skype-like video conversation that also included programming challenges occurring during the interview.

If the prospective employee was, say, a graphic designer, the interview could include a collaborative walk-through and discussion of a portfolio. User names did not have to be exchanged, since an interview could be scheduled online and a link sent to the prospect. With Skype, for instance, the prospect would have the interviewer's user name after the interview, and vice versa.

Tapjoy's History

Marissa Mayer, the Yahoo CEO, has said on several occasions that the company receives 12,000 resumes a week from people interested in working there.

The engineers behind Distill had also been part of the original team that created Tapjoy, a performance-based mobile advertising platform. Tapjoy encouraged mobile device users to watch an ad or download an app in exchange for rewards.

Tapjoy's history includes some controversy. It had been criticized for offering allegedly "free" services that later charged monthly fees on credit cards. However, Tapjoy has now reportedly cleaned up its act, and says it reaches about 450 million mobile users monthly.

A Distill co-founder, Deng-Kai Chen, has described himself in his LinkedIn profile as having been Tapjoy's third employee. Co-founder Ken MacInnis was at StumbleUpon, and later at Yahoo. In all, seven of Distill's employees are moving to Yahoo, including others who also...

Comments are closed.