Why Ad Blockers Aren’t the Answer for the Internet

Following Apple?EU?s footsteps and tapping into the ad blocking software trend, Samsung Android-powered phones now allow users to install ad-blocker extensions on the smartphhone?EU?s default browser. Users will have to decide to flip the switch in the settings to start blocking ads and the new feature is only available for Android Lollipop or higher users, according to a BBC report.

Apple came out with ad blockers on the iPhone in September, igniting a debate in the advertising industry. Clearly, if too many people block ads, the main funding model for Internet content will be in jeopardy. Publishers rely on ad revenue for paying staff to produce content, which can then be offered free to readers.

Yet the trend continues. App makers like Adblock Browser have launched software to block ads on smartphones, while Adblock Plus, a desktop browser extension, lets users surf the Web without seeing ads. And Brave, a new browser developed by Mozilla co-founder Bendan Eich, blocks ads by default, replacing those blocked ads with its own anonymous ads that supposedly don't invade user privacy.

Why Ad Blockers Won't Fix the Problem

Samsung could not immediately be reached for comment, but Greg Sterling, vice president of strategy and insight for the Local Search Association, told us he believes Samsung is going down the ad blocking road for one reason: to emulate Apple. That reason is on par with many other aspects of Samsung's smartphone strategy.

"More broadly, however, ad blocking is an issue that the industry as a whole is going to have to address in a thoughtful and meaningful way," Sterling said. "Considering ad blocking as illegal or unethical isn't going to help. Addressing the root causes -- the malware, low-quality ads, and page load times, is what's required."

Indeed, Eich, who recently launched the Brave browser, said users don't want to...

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Why Ad Blockers Aren’t the Answer for the Internet

Following Apple?EU?s footsteps and tapping into the ad blocking software trend, Samsung Android-powered phones now allow users to install ad-blocker extensions on the smartphhone?EU?s default browser. Users will have to decide to flip the switch in the settings to start blocking ads and the new feature is only available for Android Lollipop or higher users, according to a BBC report.

Apple came out with ad blockers on the iPhone in September, igniting a debate in the advertising industry. Clearly, if too many people block ads, the main funding model for Internet content will be in jeopardy. Publishers rely on ad revenue for paying staff to produce content, which can then be offered free to readers.

Yet the trend continues. App makers like Adblock Browser have launched software to block ads on smartphones, while Adblock Plus, a desktop browser extension, lets users surf the Web without seeing ads. And Brave, a new browser developed by Mozilla co-founder Bendan Eich, blocks ads by default, replacing those blocked ads with its own anonymous ads that supposedly don't invade user privacy.

Why Ad Blockers Won't Fix the Problem

Samsung could not immediately be reached for comment, but Greg Sterling, vice president of strategy and insight for the Local Search Association, told us he believes Samsung is going down the ad blocking road for one reason: to emulate Apple. That reason is on par with many other aspects of Samsung's smartphone strategy.

"More broadly, however, ad blocking is an issue that the industry as a whole is going to have to address in a thoughtful and meaningful way," Sterling said. "Considering ad blocking as illegal or unethical isn't going to help. Addressing the root causes -- the malware, low-quality ads, and page load times, is what's required."

Indeed, Eich, who recently launched the Brave browser, said users don't want to...

Comments are closed.