What Security Pros Need To Know About the State of the Internet

Akamai has released its latest State of the Internet Report, this issue covering the first quarter of 2014. While the report touches on everything from connection speeds to mobile connectivity to 4K readiness to IPv6 to traffic patterns across leading Web properties, the most interesting part of the report in today's Internet world may be the security aspects.

Indeed, Akamai tapped into its distributed set of unadvertised agents it has deployed across the Internet to surface some data that IT security admins need to know. These agents log connection attempts the company classifies as "attack traffic." Using this data, Akamai zeroes in on the top countries -- and top ports -- generating this attack traffic.

Attack traffic originated from 194 unique countries and regions in the first quarter of 2014. That's six more than the fourth quarter of 2013. Not surprising is the fact that China remains responsible for originating the most attacks, even though it dropped slightly from 43 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 to 41 percent in the first quarter of 2014.

What Port Is Most Attacked?

The U.S. is hardly blameless, coming in second to China. However, attack traffic from the U.S. also saw a decline from 19 percent to 11 percent, while Indonesia saw a slight rise, from 5.7 percent to 6.8 percent, to take the third-place position. Overall, the concentration of attacks dipped significantly as compared with the fourth quarter of 2013.

In terms of ports, Port 445, which is also known as the Microsoft-DS port, is still the most targeted port in the first quarter of 2014. The good news is associated attack traffic volume was down to 14 percent of observed attack traffic. That figure was 30 percent in the third quarter of 2013.

Meanwhile, Port 5000, also referred to as the Universal Plug &...

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