Uncertainty Clouds BlackBerry’s Sales Picture

A day after BlackBerry's announcement that it was signing a letter of intent to be taken private by investors, there are questions about the impact this move could have on the company's position. Does an acquisition make current and future customers more or less skittish about buying BlackBerry products and services?

The Waterloo, Ontario-based phone maker said Monday it had agreed to a letter of intent by Canadian investment firm Fairfax Financial Holdings to purchase the company's stock for $9 per share in cash. Fairfax owns about 10 percent of BlackBerry, and is led by Prem Watsa, a former member of BlackBerry's board.

The letter is not a purchase agreement, and gives Fairfax until Nov. 4 to complete due diligence. During that period, Fairfax will more thoroughly investigate BlackBerry's situation and will seek to raise financing, while BlackBerry is free to accept other offers, although it would have to pay a fee of about $150 million to Fairfax if the handset maker breaks off negotiations.

IT Managers

A key question is whether this due diligence period is giving BlackBerry's customers and would-be customers cold feet about making or continuing to make a purchase decision in a platform that is clearly in a transitional phase.

Charles King, an analyst with industry research fund Pund-IT, told us that, if he were an IT manager, this news might make him "more comfortable with BlackBerry because of an infusion of capital" toward which the company appears headed. He also added that the long-term stability of the company "could come down to whether it can be run in a profitable manner in a niche," such as the narrower direction that Fairfax appears to be encouraging.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, for instance, Watsa said that an acquisition by his company would continue "the execution of a long-term strategy in a...

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