Startup Aims To Be ‘Ghostbusters’ After Businesses Are Hacked

With every new hack of computer networks comes a raft of questions about how it happened and what kind of security can prevent the next one.

Yet the recent hacking of consumer credit reporting agency Equifax's network has raised the question of not just want can be done to stop such attacks, but what the hacking victim can do after the fact.

The Equifax hack exposed Social Security numbers, credit card accounts and other personal information of as many as 143 million Americans. For individuals, fewer things are more personal than one's identity, and people want to know that when they shop or do anything online, their personal data will be secure.

That's where software startup Sift Science comes in. The company offers what it calls its Trust Platform -- a lineup of products designed to attack potential areas of online fraud for industries and businesses. Its goal is to catch fraudulent activities before they affect those businesses' operations and, eventually, their customers.

"Breaches happen. They are a fact of life and are going to be of larger and of greater magnitude," said Jason Tan, chief executive of the six-year-old startup. "As more information is stored in the the cloud, finding an intelligent approach to figuring out what to do after a hack attack occurs is critical."

In Tan's view, Sift Science is like one of the great entertainment touchstones of all time.

"We are like the Ghostbusters," Tan said. "We don't prevent the portal from being opened. We deal with the aftermath of ghosts wreaking havoc on the city."

And with so much havoc being wreaked with each new hack -- from Target to Yahoo and Equifax -- San Francisco-based Sift Science has found a place in the market for its approach to post-attack network security.

The company, with 122 employees, was launched out of the Y...

Comments are closed.

Startup Aims To Be ‘Ghostbusters’ After Businesses Are Hacked

With every new hack of computer networks comes a raft of questions about how it happened and what kind of security can prevent the next one.

Yet the recent hacking of consumer credit reporting agency Equifax's network has raised the question of not just want can be done to stop such attacks, but what the hacking victim can do after the fact.

The Equifax hack exposed Social Security numbers, credit card accounts and other personal information of as many as 143 million Americans. For individuals, fewer things are more personal than one's identity, and people want to know that when they shop or do anything online, their personal data will be secure.

That's where software startup Sift Science comes in. The company offers what it calls its Trust Platform -- a lineup of products designed to attack potential areas of online fraud for industries and businesses. Its goal is to catch fraudulent activities before they affect those businesses' operations and, eventually, their customers.

"Breaches happen. They are a fact of life and are going to be of larger and of greater magnitude," said Jason Tan, chief executive of the six-year-old startup. "As more information is stored in the the cloud, finding an intelligent approach to figuring out what to do after a hack attack occurs is critical."

In Tan's view, Sift Science is like one of the great entertainment touchstones of all time.

"We are like the Ghostbusters," Tan said. "We don't prevent the portal from being opened. We deal with the aftermath of ghosts wreaking havoc on the city."

And with so much havoc being wreaked with each new hack -- from Target to Yahoo and Equifax -- San Francisco-based Sift Science has found a place in the market for its approach to post-attack network security.

The company, with 122 employees, was launched out of the Y...

Comments are closed.