Russian Hackers Attack CNET Database

ItEUs hardly the notorious hacker group Anonymous, but the results are similar. Technology review site CNET was attacked by Russian hackers over the weekend.

A Twitter user or users who goes by the name EUw0rmEU with the handle @rev-priv8 put up an image of an apparent remote access to a CNET.com server. According to Forbes, the screenshot depicted a shell proving hackers had compromised the site.

So far, CNET is not offering insight into what may have motivated the hacker or hackers or whether or not any of its data was compromised. In a published statement, Jen Boscacci, senior manager of corporate communications at CNET, said: EUHereEUs the situation, a few servers were accessed. We identified the issue and resolved it yesterday. We will continue to monitor.EU

A String of Media Attacks

Janne Ahlberg, a product security professional at Microsoft who speaks freely on Twitter about security issues, offered an update to the Forbes story on Twitter early Monday. He said the EUperpetrator appears to be offering database for 1 Bitcoin.EU

This would seem logical, given suspected ties between w0rm and the Dec. 2013 BBC hack. Reports of Russian hackers who stealthily took over a BBC computer server before Christmas circulated far and wide last year. Those hackers were known by the monikers "HASH" and "Rev0lver" and attempted to sell access to the BBC server on Dec. 25, according to Reuters.

There was a rush of hackers attacking media sites in 2013. Last December, hackers hit The Washington Post for at least the third time in the past three years. The Post was more forthcoming than the BBC, disclosing that the extent of the data loss was not clear, but employees were instructed to change their user names and passwords -- even though they were stored in encrypted form -- based on the assumption that...

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Russian Hackers Attack CNET Database

ItEUs hardly the notorious hacker group Anonymous, but the results are similar. Technology review site CNET was attacked by Russian hackers over the weekend.

A Twitter user or users who goes by the name EUw0rmEU with the handle @rev-priv8 put up an image of an apparent remote access to a CNET.com server. According to Forbes, the screenshot depicted a shell proving hackers had compromised the site.

So far, CNET is not offering insight into what may have motivated the hacker or hackers or whether or not any of its data was compromised. In a published statement, Jen Boscacci, senior manager of corporate communications at CNET, said: EUHereEUs the situation, a few servers were accessed. We identified the issue and resolved it yesterday. We will continue to monitor.EU

A String of Media Attacks

Janne Ahlberg, a product security professional at Microsoft who speaks freely on Twitter about security issues, offered an update to the Forbes story on Twitter early Monday. He said the EUperpetrator appears to be offering database for 1 Bitcoin.EU

This would seem logical, given suspected ties between w0rm and the Dec. 2013 BBC hack. Reports of Russian hackers who stealthily took over a BBC computer server before Christmas circulated far and wide last year. Those hackers were known by the monikers "HASH" and "Rev0lver" and attempted to sell access to the BBC server on Dec. 25, according to Reuters.

There was a rush of hackers attacking media sites in 2013. Last December, hackers hit The Washington Post for at least the third time in the past three years. The Post was more forthcoming than the BBC, disclosing that the extent of the data loss was not clear, but employees were instructed to change their user names and passwords -- even though they were stored in encrypted form -- based on the assumption that...

Comments are closed.