Review: Jobs Is About Apple More Than the Man

A better title for this film might have been "The History of Apple Computers." "Jobs" aims to be the first biopic about tech giant Steve Jobs (Sony's Aaron Sorkin project is next), but instead of offering insight into the man, it's a chronology of Apple and the advent of personal computers.

Ashton Kutcher plays Jobs convincingly enough. The "Two and a Half Men" star looks uncannily like the Apple co-founder, right down to the lumbering gait, and there's no trace of Kutcher's kooky-character past here. But with a script by first-time screenwriter Matt Whitely that focuses more on corporate events than characters, there's no chance to look deeper into the man behind the Mac.

Directed by Joshua Michael Stern ("Swing Vote"), "Jobs" opens with the Apple chief introducing the first iPod in 2001. Then it jumps back almost 30 years, when Jobs was a scruffy, barefoot, Reed College dropout on campus just for kicks. (James Woods appears briefly as a concerned school administrator, but is never seen again.) Jobs hallucinates in a field, travels to India, and suddenly it's 1976, and he's struggling in his job at Atari. Prone to outbursts and, apparently, body odor, he turns to his friend, Steve "Woz" Wozniak (Josh Gad), for help. Jobs discovers a computer prototype Woz built, and a few months later, Apple Computers is born.

Gad is the heart of the film. Though his character, like the others, is weakly developed, Gad's vulnerability as Wozniak makes him the most relatable. There's also heart in the soundtrack, a romp through the 1960s and 70s that includes songs by Cat Stevens, Joe Walsh and Bob Dylan.

Jobs, on the other hand, could be a real jerk. He dismisses his pregnant girlfriend (Ahna O'Reilly) and denies paternity of their daughter. He withholds stock benefits from founding members of his...

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