Qualcomm Seeks Partial Ban on iPhone X, Apple Countersues

The ongoing intellectual property rights conflict between Apple and Qualcomm took another turn Wednesday, when Apple filed a countersuit against the chipmaker in U.S. District Court in California.

On Wednesday, Apple filed a countersuit in the ongoing dispute asserting that Qualcomm has infringed on eight of its patents related to battery-efficiency technologies. On the same day, Qualcomm lodged three new legal complaints against Apple for patent infringement, alleging that the iPhone maker is wrongfully using 16 of Qualcomm's technologies in its cellphones and the Apple Watch.

At the root of the conflict between the two companies is Qualcomm's broadband processor technology that enables mobile phones to connect with cellular networks. Qualcomm's modem chip design was used to set the industry standard for mobile communications, and cellphone makers, including Apple, have paid Qualcomm regular royalties for the rights to use that technology.

Earlier this year, Apple began withholding those royalty payments -- totalling around $2 billion per year -- to Qualcomm. In the meantime, Qualcomm has sought to ban the sale of iPhones in China and has asked the U.S. International Trade Commission to prohibit the importation of some iPhone models, including the recently launched flagship iPhone X, that use a competing modem chip from Intel.

Qualcomm 'Like a Common Patent Troll'

This summer, Qualcomm filed a complaint alleging that Apple was infringing on its power-efficiency technologies for mobile phones. Apple's countersuit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court, Southern District of California, claims that Qualcomm is wrongly using some of Apple's battery life technologies.

"Qualcomm has struggled mightily to maintain its monopoly position through intimidation, litigation, and manipulation, for all the reasons set forth in the co-pending matter before this Court," Apple stated in its countersuit. "The weak patents Qualcomm asserts here for the first time appear to be a blatant effort...

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Qualcomm Seeks Partial Ban on iPhone X, Apple Countersues

The ongoing intellectual property rights conflict between Apple and Qualcomm took another turn Wednesday, when Apple filed a countersuit against the chipmaker in U.S. District Court in California.

On Wednesday, Apple filed a countersuit in the ongoing dispute asserting that Qualcomm has infringed on eight of its patents related to battery-efficiency technologies. On the same day, Qualcomm lodged three new legal complaints against Apple for patent infringement, alleging that the iPhone maker is wrongfully using 16 of Qualcomm's technologies in its cellphones and the Apple Watch.

At the root of the conflict between the two companies is Qualcomm's broadband processor technology that enables mobile phones to connect with cellular networks. Qualcomm's modem chip design was used to set the industry standard for mobile communications, and cellphone makers, including Apple, have paid Qualcomm regular royalties for the rights to use that technology.

Earlier this year, Apple began withholding those royalty payments -- totalling around $2 billion per year -- to Qualcomm. In the meantime, Qualcomm has sought to ban the sale of iPhones in China and has asked the U.S. International Trade Commission to prohibit the importation of some iPhone models, including the recently launched flagship iPhone X, that use a competing modem chip from Intel.

Qualcomm 'Like a Common Patent Troll'

This summer, Qualcomm filed a complaint alleging that Apple was infringing on its power-efficiency technologies for mobile phones. Apple's countersuit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court, Southern District of California, claims that Qualcomm is wrongly using some of Apple's battery life technologies.

"Qualcomm has struggled mightily to maintain its monopoly position through intimidation, litigation, and manipulation, for all the reasons set forth in the co-pending matter before this Court," Apple stated in its countersuit. "The weak patents Qualcomm asserts here for the first time appear to be a blatant effort...

Comments are closed.