Pentagon Eyes Blockchain Technology as Cybersecurity Shield

Used by terrorists, drug dealers and money launderers, the shadowy online currency bitcoin may soon be drafted by the Pentagon as a way to shield U.S. military technology, communications and purchases.

Private analysts say that using blockchain, the technological backbone of bitcoin, could dramatically improve security across the U.S. military, preventing megahacks, tampering and cyberhijackings of vehicles, aircraft or satellites.

Particularly alarming to U.S. defense analysts are Chinese intelligence collection operations aimed at commercial transactions, which have been highlighted as a growing threat to U.S. national security with the American military personnel, national security decision-makers and critical infrastructure entities increasingly targeted.

"Our dependence on foreign supply chains is a reality that policymakers will have to contend with in an increasingly open global economy," wrote the authors of a recent research memo published by the Washington-based Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

To confront threats, the military has begun experimenting with blockchain, essentially a decentralized digital ledger system, or database, stored in multiple copies across a large group of users.

Investors have taken note of the U.S. military's interest in blockchain technology. Last year, the market for blockchain tech vendors accounted for $75 billion, analysts said. In 2019, it is projected to reach $108 billion.

The key to blockchain's security: Any changes made to the database are immediately sent to all users to create a secure, established record. With copies of the data in all users' hands -- even if some users are hacked -- the overall database remains safe.

This tamper-proof, decentralized feature has made blockchain increasingly popular beyond its original function supporting the bitcoin digital transactions. Many cutting-edge finance firms, for instance, have used blockchain to expedite processes and cut costs without compromising security.

In Estonia, home of the video phone pioneer Skype, officials have reported using blockchain to track national health records. In Russia, experiments are underway...

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Pentagon Eyes Blockchain Technology as Cybersecurity Shield

Used by terrorists, drug dealers and money launderers, the shadowy online currency bitcoin may soon be drafted by the Pentagon as a way to shield U.S. military technology, communications and purchases.

Private analysts say that using blockchain, the technological backbone of bitcoin, could dramatically improve security across the U.S. military, preventing megahacks, tampering and cyberhijackings of vehicles, aircraft or satellites.

Particularly alarming to U.S. defense analysts are Chinese intelligence collection operations aimed at commercial transactions, which have been highlighted as a growing threat to U.S. national security with the American military personnel, national security decision-makers and critical infrastructure entities increasingly targeted.

"Our dependence on foreign supply chains is a reality that policymakers will have to contend with in an increasingly open global economy," wrote the authors of a recent research memo published by the Washington-based Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

To confront threats, the military has begun experimenting with blockchain, essentially a decentralized digital ledger system, or database, stored in multiple copies across a large group of users.

Investors have taken note of the U.S. military's interest in blockchain technology. Last year, the market for blockchain tech vendors accounted for $75 billion, analysts said. In 2019, it is projected to reach $108 billion.

The key to blockchain's security: Any changes made to the database are immediately sent to all users to create a secure, established record. With copies of the data in all users' hands -- even if some users are hacked -- the overall database remains safe.

This tamper-proof, decentralized feature has made blockchain increasingly popular beyond its original function supporting the bitcoin digital transactions. Many cutting-edge finance firms, for instance, have used blockchain to expedite processes and cut costs without compromising security.

In Estonia, home of the video phone pioneer Skype, officials have reported using blockchain to track national health records. In Russia, experiments are underway...

Comments are closed.