iPhone 8 vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Specs and features compared – CNET

If you're looking for a new iPhone at the lowest price possible, the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus from 2017 are viable options. (They're still so viable, in fact, that the US Census Bureau is using the iPhone 8 specifically to conduct the 2020 Census.) Though Apple discontinued selling them, you can still nab the devices from third-party retailers like Walmart and Best Buy. Prices will vary depending on the retailer and the phone's model and capacity, but from what we've seen so far, the iPhone 8 (64GB) averages about $350 and the iPhone 8 Plus (64GB) averages about $450. You can get them refurbished for about $100 less. (You tend to only see refurbished or "renewed" stock in the UK and Australia, starting at about £260 or AU$400 for the iPhone 8, and £430 or AU$600 for the iPhone 8 Plus.)

Unlike current iPhones, the iPhone 8 phones sport an intuitive home button and familiar design. If those are the main draw for you though, we suggest the iPhone SE 2020. Like the iPhone 8, it doesn't have a headphone jack, but as the newer phone, it has better hardware, more software support and a more robust Apple return policy and trade-in value. (For more information, read our comparison piece, iPhone SE vs. iPhone 8: The differences that matter to the budget-conscious.)

Nevertheless, if you are committed to an iPhone 8, but don't know which model you should get, we'll walk you through their main differences to help you make a more informed decision.

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At about $100 cheaper than the iPhone 8 Plus, we prefer the iPhone 8 largely due to the money you'll save. Though its screen isn't as big and sharp as the iPhone 8 Plus, nor does it have a telephoto lens, for most people the iPhone 8 has enough to satisfy your most casual phone needs. But if you do have more money to spend, we once again suggest the newer iPhone SE, which starts at $399 (£419 and AU$749). At about $50 more you'll get a better camera, a faster processor and dual-SIM capabilities. Read our Apple iPhone 8 review.

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If you prioritize having a bigger screen to watch videos or play games, and a telephoto camera to capture beautiful portrait shots of your friends and family, then go for the iPhone 8 Plus. Everything else about the phone though, except for a slightly longer battery life (and the additional $100 price tag), is pretty much the same as the iPhone 8. Read our Apple iPhone 8 Plus review.

iPhone 8 and 8 Plus design: Choose your size

As counterparts to one another, the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus look nearly identical, except for the fact that the iPhone 8 Plus is bigger and has a higher resolution. It has a 5.5-inch, 1080p LCD display while the iPhone 8 has a 4.7-inch, 750p screen. 

Despite the obvious size difference though, you still have to consider how the size will affect your everyday interaction with the phone. If you have a smaller grip, for example, the iPhone 8 is more comfortable to hold and fits into pockets easier. If you watch a lot of video and play games, the larger iPhone 8 Plus is more immersive. And even though you might not be able to discern it with the naked eye, given the iPhone 8 Plus' greater resolution and pixel density, images are a tad sharper (at least on paper anyway).

Other than that though, the devices are similar. They come in three colors (white, black and gold), but phones this old means limited inventory, so retailers may stock fewer options. They are both water resistant and have wireless charging. But they also don't have headphone jacks and -- instead of swiping gestures for navigating or Face ID, like in newer phones -- they have a physical home button that houses the fingerprint reader. 

iPhone 8 Plus' second telephoto camera

While both phones have the same 12-megapixel standard camera with the same f1.8 aperture, only the 8 Plus has a second telephoto camera. With this second camera you can take portrait shots with a depth-of-field, bokeh effect that adds a lot of drama. Apple also added five lighting tools that you can apply to portraits, which include studio and stage lighting.

In addition to portraits, the telephoto camera adds some extra zoom. While the iPhone 8 only has digital zoom up to 5x, the telephoto offers a clearer 2x telephoto or optical zoom that does not degrade the photo's quality. The iPhone 8 Plus' digital zoom also goes up to 10x.

iPhone 8 and 8 Plus battery

Because the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus both have the Apple A11 Bionic processor, expect them to perform as reliably and quickly as each other. As for their batteries, Apple never releases those specs, but third-party teardowns have reported that the iPhone 8 has a 1,821-mAh battery and the 8 Plus has a 2,675-mAh battery. The phones clocked in similar times for our lab tests for continuous video playback on Airplane mode. The iPhone 8 lasted 13.5 hours while the 8 Plus lasted slightly longer at 13.75 hours. All in all, expect similar battery lives for both phones.

iPhone 8, 8 Plus and SE spec comparison


iPhone 8 iPhone 8 Plus Apple iPhone SE (2020)
Display size, resolution 4.7-inch; 1,334x750 pixels 5.5-inch; 1,920x1,080 pixels 4.7-inch; 1,334x750 pixels
Pixel density 326 ppi 401 ppi 326 ppi
Dimensions (Inches) 5.45x2.65x0.29 in 6.24x3.07x0.3 in 5.45x2.65x0.29 in
Dimensions (Millimeters) 138.4x67.3x7.3 mm 158.4x78.1x7.5 mm 138x67x7.3 mm
Weight (Ounces, Grams) 5.22 oz; 148g 7.13 oz; 202g 5.22 oz; 148g
Mobile software iOS 11, can update to iOS 13 iOS 11, can update to iOS 13 iOS 13
Camera 12-megapixel (wide-angle) 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto) 12-megapixel (wide-angle)
Front-facing camera 7-megapixel 7-megapixel 7-megapixel
Video capture 4K 4K 4K
Processor Apple A11 Bionic Apple A11 Bionic Apple A13 Bionic
Storage 64GB, 128GB, 256GB 64GB, 128GB, 256GB 64GB, 128GB, 256GB
RAM 2GB 3GB Not disclosed
Expandable storage None None None
Battery 1,821 mAh (Apple doesn't confirm this) 2,675 mAh (Apple doesn't confirm this) 1,821 mAh (Apple doesn't confirm this)
Fingerprint sensor Home button Home button Home button
Connector Lightning Lightning Lightning
Headphone jack No No No
Special features Water resistant (IP67); wireless charging Water-resistant (IP67); wireless charging Water resistant (IP67); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging

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The Kandi K23 and K27 look weird – Roadshow

Discuss: The Kandi K23 and K27 look weird

Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic. We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. Discussion threads can be closed at any time at our discretion.

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The Rank Hypocrisy of a TikTok Ban

On Friday, the President of the United States declared that he intends to ban a vibrant source of American speech. And that he intends to eliminate competition in a giant industry that doesn’t have nearly enough. It’s a rare feat to upturn two such fundamental democratic values—free speech and free markets—at the same time.

TikTok’s fate in the US remains uncertain. Trump’s declarations could be part of a negotiating strategy, with the intended goal of getting Bytedance, TikTok’s Chinese parent company, removed entirely from the platform’s ownership. Microsoft may then swoop in. Trump’s proposed executive order could face legal review, and TikTok has vowed that it’s “not planning on going anywhere.” But regardless of how this all shakes out, the president’s declaration stinks of rank hypocrisy.

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Nicholas Thompson (@nxthompson is the editor-in-chief of WIRED.

It’s certainly true that all Chinese companies must play footsie with the state, sharing data if and when the ruling Communist Party demands it. (TikTok has consistently denied that it has done so.) It’s true, too, that the Chinese government of Xi Jinping does not wish the United States well, and that its hacking and espionage operations have deep and malevolent roots. It’s true that smart people have raised valid concerns about TikTok’s security: any company that copies what you put on your clipboard is one that deserves very little trust. But that’s a reason to ban the app on the phones of American soldiers and diplomats, and it’s reason to warn others about the risks. It’s an argument, too, that US data privacy laws are woefully inadequate to protect people from data over-reaches by any app, regardless of the country of origin. But the public evidence that TikTok is a fundamental, and unique, threat to US security is simply not there.

TikTok, however, is a threat to Facebook: It’s a legitimate competitor that has been able to thrive without being captured or killed. During the antitrust hearings on Wednesday, one of Congress’s central critiques was that Facebook uses all the secret information it gathers to sniff out its nascent opposition. “Will [Zuckerberg] go into destroy mode if I say no?” Instagram founder Kevin Systrom asked one of his board members, Matt Cohler, while discussing a potential Facebook acquisition of his company. “Probably,” came the reply, according to a memo released during the hearings.

Instagram and Whatsapp were gobbled by Facebook and Snapchat was hobbled. But TikTok has survived Facebook’s destroy mode. The US company didn’t recognize its growth, and misunderstood its genius. By the time Facebook first tried desperately to copy and clone, it was too late. But now, with Trump’s aggressive stance, Facebook has been given a gift from above. Its new TikTok twin, Instagram’s Reels, launches soon. Without TikTok, the road to its success would be more open and clear.

There has been a certain amount of conspiratorial talk about Trump and Zuckerberg since the two had dinner last November: theorizing perhaps that they reached some sort of tacit agreement that Zuckerberg would allow Trump to use the platform as he saw fit, and Trump would help Zuckerberg in other ways? I’ve always doubted that there was anything explicit. But powerful diplomacy doesn’t work that way. It happens through subtle signals, winks, and nods. And I doubt that Zuckerberg’s kindness toward the White House didn’t weigh somewhat in Trump’s mind.

But this of course just lays bare the hypocrisy in Trump’s move. It’s a move against free speech and, to the extent that Facebook has been gentle on the president, it’s because of Zuckerberg’s defense of that fundamental right. And if one is an avid believer in free speech, how can one even threaten the death penalty for a social media platforrm? TikTok is full of garbage and sometimes hate. But it’s free and open, even in ways that other platforms aren’t. Conservative critics who rail about Twitter’s lack of respect for the First Amendment are often just working the refs. But many are sincere. I am eager to see how they respond to the news of today. (I reached out to the White House for comment and will update if I am able to speak with them.)

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Learn a new language while saving 50% at Babbel – CNET

babbel
Babbel

If one of your personal improvement goals during the pandemic has been to master a new language, there's never been a better time. And I don't mean it's a good time because it looks like staying at home is the new normal. Right now, language learning app Babbel is offering 50% off subscription plans, which makes immersing yourself in a foreign language more affordable than ever.

In CNET's recent roundup of the best language learning apps of 2020, Babbel topped the list. Reviewer Shelby Brown said that of the apps in her roundup, Babbel was most like a traditional foreign language course in an online school curriculum. The app has an encouragingly minimalist layout and each lesson is bite-sized -- just 15 minutes so you can fit it into your busy workday.

From now through Aug. 9, Babbel is offering 50% off its six-month, 12-month, and 24-month subscriptions plans. To get the deal, go to the site's deal page and spin the wheel of savings. Spoiler alert: It'll always land on 50%. Here's how the savings add up:

  • 6 months: Regularly $44.70, you can get Babbel for $22.35 ($3.73 per month)
  • 12 months: Regularly $83.40, you can get Babbel  for $41.45 ($3.45 per month)
  • 24 months: Regularly $155.95, you can get Babbel  for $77.90 ($3.25 per month)

There are over a dozen languages to choose from, including Spanish, French, Italian, German, Portuguese, Russian, Norwegian, Dutch, Polish, Indonesian, Danish, Swedish and Turkish. 


CNET's Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest promo codes from Best BuyWalmartAmazon and more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

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Last chance to save $45 organizing your garage with a Fleximount overhead storage rack – CNET

fleximount
Fleximount

Summer is a good time to clean up and organize the garage, and there's probably no better way to remake your garage than by getting your stuff off the floor. Fleximounts overhead racks are ideal for the job -- they're easy to assemble, modular and give you a lot of easily accessed storage space. Right now, you can get a Fleximount 4-by-8-foot ceiling rack for $135 when you click the $45-off coupon on the product page. That's down from the regular price of $180, and represents the best price we've ever seen.

The rack is a rigid grid design and made from cold-rolled steel. It screws together securely and hangs from virtually any joist configuration -- you can run each of the 4x8 modular sections in parallel along a pair of joists or perpendicular across six studs, and supports a maximum load of about 600 pounds. The drop height can be anywhere from 22 to 40 inches from the ceiling. And you can combine as many as you need to blanket your ceiling in storage, or just install one or two as needed. 

The $45 discount applies to the black finish, but you can also choose to get it finished in white for the same price: The Fleximount 4-by-8-foot rack in white is also $135 when you apply the $40 discount from the $175 price. 

I'm guessing that after this deal expires on Aug. 2 you might not see a price this good again until Black Friday. But by then, it'll be too cold to work in the garage. 

This article was first published earlier this week. 


CNET's Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest promo codes from Best BuyWalmartAmazon and more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

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Last chance to save $45 organizing your garage with a Fleximount overhead storage rack – CNET

fleximount
Fleximount

Summer is a good time to clean up and organize the garage, and there's probably no better way to remake your garage than by getting your stuff off the floor. Fleximounts overhead racks are ideal for the job -- they're easy to assemble, modular and give you a lot of easily accessed storage space. Right now, you can get a Fleximount 4-by-8-foot ceiling rack for $135 when you click the $45-off coupon on the product page. That's down from the regular price of $180, and represents the best price we've ever seen.

The rack is a rigid grid design and made from cold-rolled steel. It screws together securely and hangs from virtually any joist configuration -- you can run each of the 4x8 modular sections in parallel along a pair of joists or perpendicular across six studs, and supports a maximum load of about 600 pounds. The drop height can be anywhere from 22 to 40 inches from the ceiling. And you can combine as many as you need to blanket your ceiling in storage, or just install one or two as needed. 

The $45 discount applies to the black finish, but you can also choose to get it finished in white for the same price: The Fleximount 4-by-8-foot rack in white is also $135 when you apply the $40 discount from the $175 price. 

I'm guessing that after this deal expires on Aug. 2 you might not see a price this good again until Black Friday. But by then, it'll be too cold to work in the garage. 

This article was first published earlier this week. 


CNET's Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest promo codes from Best BuyWalmartAmazon and more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

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Rite Aid Used Facial Recognition in Stores for Nearly a Decade

Just over two weeks after an unprecedented hack led to the compromise of the Twitter accounts of Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Barack Obama, and dozens more, authorities have charged three men in connection with the incident. The alleged “mastermind” is a 17-year-old from Tampa, who will be tried as an adult. There are still plenty of details outstanding about how they might have pulled it off, but court documents show how a trail of bitcoin and IP addresses led investigators to the alleged hackers.

A Garmin ransomware hack disrupted more than just workouts during a days-long outage; security researchers see it as part of a troubling trend of “big game hunting” among ransomware groups. In other alarming trends, hackers are breaking into news sites to publish misinformation through their content management systems, giving them an air of legitimacy. And we took a look at how AI helped uncover Chinese boats lurking in North Korean waters.

A WIRED investigation found dozens of children apparently under the age of 13 streaming on Twitch, as well as strangers sending them disturbing chat messages. After we published our report, Twitch removed a search option that made it easier to find those streams to begin with.

We also gave you nine tips to better secure your cloud storage service of choice and dove into the world of so-called dark patterns, the manipulative interface designs that plague so much of the modern web.

And there’s more! Every Saturday we round up the security and privacy stories that we didn’t break or report on in depth but think you should know about. Click on the headlines to read them, and stay safe out there.

Reuters this week published a deep investigation into the use of facial recognition technology by Rite Aid, which the drugstore chain deployed to 200 stores over the last eight years. The tech was installed largely in low-income neighborhoods in New York and Los Angeles, alarming civil liberties advocates. Of further concern was that Rite Aid outsourced some of its technology from a company with links to the Chinese government. Rite Aid stopped using facial recognition following Reuters inquiries, but the breadth, focus, and duration of its implementation is still alarming.

The leak itself occurred two weeks ago, but Motherboard has a great dive into the ripples caused by the so-called gigaleak, a trove of historical Nintendo source code, prototypes, emails, and more. The contents of the gigaleak are compelling enough on their own, but so are the tensions its release has caused, especially given Nintendo’s litigious reputation.

Millions of people rely on the Tor for anonymity, and it remains a good bet for most use cases. But security researcher Neal Krawetz this week dropped two apparent zero-day vulnerabilities in the browser. He also plans to disclose three more, one of which could reveal Tor server IP addresses. Krawetz said he went public with the security issues because the Tor Project has been unresponsive when he’s tried to report problems responsibly in the past.

Who among us! This week, newsletter platform SubStack sent an email out to subscribers with an update to its privacy policy. Unfortunately, for a “small percentage” of users it forgot to BCC, leading to a potentially explosive reply-all apocalypse. “We are so sorry this happened—and we are aware of the irony,” the company said in an apologetic tweet. (Anecdotally, the people on those lists showed remarkable restraint.)


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2020 Honda E driven, 2021 Ford Bronco reservations and more: Roadshow’s week in review – Roadshow

I want one.

Honda

Welcome to August, Roadshow readers. Thanks for kicking the new month off with us as we look back on the final week of July.

We had a go in the totally adorable Honda E electric car and drove the gorgeous Lexus LC 500 Convertible, but there was plenty of other big news.

Stick with us as we take a look at the best of the best from July 26 to Aug. 1.

Top reviews

Talk about forbidden fruit. We won't get the Honda E in the US, but Contributing Editor Henry Catchpole had a go with the cutesy electric car, if anything to make us North Americans super jealous.

Click here to read our 2020 Honda E first drive review.

The Lexus LC 500 is already one of the prettiest cars on the road, and if you disagree, sorry, you're wrong. Executive Editor Chris Paukert got to experience the gorgeous car in convertible form for our first drive review -- and it's good if you know what to expect from it.

Click here to read our 2021 Lexus LC 500 Convertible first drive review.

Reviews Editor Andrew Krok thinks this is the best crossover SUV General Motors has made in awhile. Sharp looks, solid technology and lots of space made it a winner in his book. Not that there weren't a few footnotes for qualms, however.

Click here to read our 2020 Chevy Blazer review.

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We were all giddy about the new Land Rover Defender when we saw it. Then, the Ford Bronco debuted. Now we don't know which one's better, so Reviews Editor Emme Hall pits them against one another.

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It's a V12 engine... and not much else. The Lamborghini SCV12 looks like a wild machine and Editor-In-Chief Tim Stevens gives us our first look at the latest raging bull.

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9 great reads from CNET this week – CNET

It was a big week for Big Tech, which was in the hot seat Wednesday for a historic antitrust hearing on Capitol Hill. Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook execs took harsh questions from hostile House subcommittee members about alleged predatory business practices, theft of digital content and aggressive copying and purchasing of competing businesses.

Then, after the hammering, the companies posted big quarterly earnings and revenue. Amazon and Facebook both saw their profit double, while Apple saw a slight increase in iPhone sales despite many of its stores being closed and much of the world locked down. Google posted a revenue and sales decline, but the results were better than Wall Street expected. 

Not to be forgotten, coronavirus deaths surpassed 150,000 in the US on Wednesday. By week's end, there were about 17.3 confirmed cases worldwide and around 674,000 deaths. Top infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci said Americans should consider wearing eye protection, such as goggles or a face shield -- in addition to a face mask -- to further protect themselves from the pandemic. 

Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google had a historic showdown with Congress. What comes next?

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Getty Images

Thousands of Chinese nationalists sent death threats to an author for writing a diary documenting the world's first coronavirus lockdown.

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty

The coronavirus pandemic helped reset the planet, giving the environment a chance to recover from the wear and tear of human activity. But that can soon change.

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A Chinese tech company owns TikTok, and US politicians worry that the Chinese government could use the app to spy on people and spread propaganda.

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NASA will attempt to search for signs of life in an ancient lakebed once believed to hold water and, for the first time, fly a helicopter on another planet.

rocket
Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Commentary: It's hard for Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook to keep up the pretense when posting massive profit in the middle of a pandemic-fueled recession.

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Brett Pearce/CNET

Despite criminal comparisons and bruised fingers, a community of hobbyist lockpickers is thriving online.

locks-david-sell
David Sell

The struggle is over the future of the web.

Apple vs Google on the future of the web
James Martin/CNET

Jacques Cousteau's grandson channels some serious sci-fi vibes for an upcoming underwater research lab.

proteus-with-sub
Yves Béhar and fuseproject

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What Can Ants and Bees Teach Us About Containing Disease?

This story originally appeared on Undark and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Given that she infects ant colonies with deadly pathogens and then studies how they respond, one might say that Nathalie Stroeymeyt, a senior lecturer in the school of biological sciences at the University of Bristol in the U.K., specializes in miniature pandemics. The tables turned on her, however, in March: Covid-19 swept through Britain, and Stroeymeyt was shut out of her ant epidemiology lab. The high-performance computers she uses to track ant behavior sat idle, and only a lab technician—deemed an essential worker—was permitted to tend to the lab’s hundreds of black garden ant colonies, each housed in its own plastic tub.

With governments across the world now encouraging people to maintain space between one another to prevent the spread of the virus, Stroeymeyt drew parallels with her insect subjects. The current guidance on social distancing “rung familiar,” Stroeymeyt said, “because I’ve been seeing it among the ants.”

Such insights are at the heart of a burgeoning field of insect research that some scientists say could help humans imagine a more pandemic-resilient society. As with humans, fending off disease can be a tall order for social insects—a category that includes termites, ants, and many species of bees and wasps. Insect workers swap fluids and share close quarters. In most species, there is heavy traffic into and out of the nest. Some ant colonies are as populous as New York City.

The insects are “living in very confined environments where there’s a lot of microbial load,” said Rebeca Rosengaus, a behavioral ecologist who studies social insect behavior at Northeastern University in Boston. Many of those microbes, she added, are pathogens that could sweep through the colony like a plague. That rarely happens, social insect researchers say, and vast colonies of such species are somehow able to limit the spread of contagions.

Over the past three decades, researchers have begun to explore just how that might occur, mapping the myriad ways that colonies avoid succumbing to disease. Some of those methods can seem alien. Others, including simple immunization-like behavior and forms of insect social distancing, can seem eerily familiar. Put together, they form a kind of parallel epidemiology that might provide insights for human societies battling pathogens of their own–even if, so far, human epidemiologists don’t pay much attention to the field.

Still, those insights are what Rosengaus and some other researchers are now exploring. “How is it possible,” Rosengaus asks, “that an individual that gets exposed to a fungus or a bacteria or a virus, or whatever pathogen there is, comes back to the colony, and does not infect everyone in the colony?”

While social insects have been the subject of intense scientific scrutiny for more than a century, the threat of pathogens and other parasites, researchers say, was long overlooked. “The mainstream social insect research has ignored parasites for a very long time,” said Paul Schmid-Hempel, an experimental ecologist at the Swiss public research university ETH Zurich. Biologist E.O. Wilson’s classic 1971 survey of the field, “The Insect Societies,” does not even list “disease,” “pathogen,” “bacteria,” or “virus” in its index.

As a postdoctoral researcher at Oxford in the 1980s, Schmid-Hempel realized that the bees he studied were constantly infested with parasites. He began to formulate questions that would help launch a small field: What if pathogens were not an incidental nuisance to colonies, but a profound threat that shaped the very evolution of their societies? To what extent were things like ant colonies and beehives actually tiny epidemic states?

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