Facebook faces lawsuit alleging failure to remove anti-Muslim hate speech – CNET

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Facebook's hate speech policies are under fire again.

Sarah Tew/CNET

The nonprofit civil rights organization Muslim Advocates has filed a lawsuit against Facebook, alleging that the social media platform's executives make false and deceptive statements about Facebook's removal of hate speech and harmful content. Arguing that Facebook is "a cesspool for hate," the complaint alleges that Facebook's failure to remove such content has amplified anti-Muslim hate, with online and real-world consequences.

According to the complaint, filed Thursday in the Superior Court for the District of Columbia, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other executives "routinely misrepresent the company's practice of routinely failing to enforce its standards and policies for keeping Facebook free of hate speech and other harmful content."

Read also: Facebook and others are failing to stop anti-Asian hate

"Anti-Muslim hate groups and hate speech run rampant on Facebook with anti-Muslim posts, ads, private groups and other content," the complaint alleges. "Armed, anti-Muslim protests in the United States have been organized on Facebook event pages."

Facebook's execs have also falsely testified to Congress and falsely promised civil rights groups that when it becomes aware of content violating its policies, it removes that content, Muslim Advocates said. Facebook has been failing or refusing to remove such content even when notified by Muslim Advocates and others, the nonprofit alleged in a press release Thursday.

The complaint asks that Facebook either stop misrepresenting that it will remove content that violates its hate speech policies, or "conform your deeds to your words."

"Facebook has been used, among other things, to orchestrate the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar, mass murders of Muslims in India, and riots and murders in Sri Lanka that targeted Muslims," Muslim Advocates alleges. The complaint also points to when a gunman used the social network to livestream the mosque shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2019.

A Facebook spokesman said 97% of the hate speech the social network removes is detected before a human flags it. "We do not allow hate speech on Facebook and regularly work with experts, non-profits, and stakeholders to help make sure Facebook is a safe place for everyone, recognizing anti-Muslim rhetoric can take different forms," he said. 

In January, Muslim Advocates also took issue with the Facebook oversight board's decision to overturn Facebook's removal of a post by a Myanmar user who had posted photos of a deceased child with the caption "[there is] something wrong with Muslims psychologically."

"It is clear that the oversight board is here to launder responsibility for Zuckerberg and [Facebook COO] Sheryl Sandberg," Muslim Advocates spokesperson Eric Naing said in a statement in January. "Instead of taking meaningful action to curb dangerous hate speech on the platform, Facebook punted responsibility to a third-party board that used laughable technicalities to protect anti-Muslim hate content that contributes to genocide."

A widespread movement in 2020 also targeted hate speech by boycotting advertising on Facebook for the month of July. Joining the campaign were Verizon, Sony, PlayStation, Microsoft, Volkswagen, Unilever, Clorox, Adidas, Ford and Denny's, among other big brands.

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NASA says Mars ‘rainbow’ spotted in Perseverance photo isn’t a rainbow – CNET

This bit of lens flare from a NASA Perseverance rover camera looks like a rainbow.

NASA/JPL-Caltech
This story is part of Welcome to Mars, our series exploring the red planet.

When you think of lens flare, you might think of flare-tastic J.J. Abrams blockbuster movies. Now you should also think of Mars.

The NASA Perseverance rover team took to Twitter this week to do a little debunking. A rover image from April 4 that appeared to show a lovely rainbow curving over the Martian landscape had been making the rounds on social media. But that's not a rainbow; it's just a camera artifact.

NASA traced the not-a-rainbow's appearance to lens flare. "Rainbows aren't possible here. Rainbows are created by light reflected off of round water droplets, but there isn't enough water here to condense, and it's too cold for liquid water in the atmosphere," said a tweet from NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover account.

The camera that snapped the image is a rear hazard-avoidance camera that helps the rover scope out what's going on behind it, especially if it needs to drive backward. Perseverance is also equipped with front hazard-avoidance cameras that have sunshades to prevent lens flare. "Sunshades weren't considered essential on my back Hazcams, so you can see scattered light artifacts in their images," the rover said in a follow-up NASA tweet.

It might be disappointing to hear that there aren't any rainbows on Mars, but there are plenty of other fantastic and very real sights, like weird rocks and the pioneering Ingenuity helicopter, which is closing in on what NASA hopes will be the first powered, controlled flight on another planet.

What we've learned is that it's not all puppies and rainbows on Mars. In fact, there are no puppies or rainbows on Mars at all.

Follow CNET's 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.     

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NASA says Mars ‘rainbow’ spotted in Perseverance photo isn’t a rainbow – CNET

This bit of lens flare from a NASA Perseverance rover camera looks like a rainbow.

NASA/JPL-Caltech
This story is part of Welcome to Mars, our series exploring the red planet.

When you think of lens flare, you might think of flare-tastic J.J. Abrams blockbuster movies. Now you should also think of Mars.

The NASA Perseverance rover team took to Twitter this week to do a little debunking. A rover image from April 4 that appeared to show a lovely rainbow curving over the Martian landscape had been making the rounds on social media. But that's not a rainbow; it's just a camera artifact.

NASA traced the not-a-rainbow's appearance to lens flare. "Rainbows aren't possible here. Rainbows are created by light reflected off of round water droplets, but there isn't enough water here to condense, and it's too cold for liquid water in the atmosphere," said a tweet from NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover account.

The camera that snapped the image is a rear hazard-avoidance camera that helps the rover scope out what's going on behind it, especially if it needs to drive backward. Perseverance is also equipped with front hazard-avoidance cameras that have sunshades to prevent lens flare. "Sunshades weren't considered essential on my back Hazcams, so you can see scattered light artifacts in their images," the rover said in a follow-up NASA tweet.

It might be disappointing to hear that there aren't any rainbows on Mars, but there are plenty of other fantastic and very real sights, like weird rocks and the pioneering Ingenuity helicopter, which is closing in on what NASA hopes will be the first powered, controlled flight on another planet.

What we've learned is that it's not all puppies and rainbows on Mars. In fact, there are no puppies or rainbows on Mars at all.

Follow CNET's 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.     

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Today’s top deals: $35 mechanical gaming keyboard, $30 massage gun and more – CNET

Happy Thursday, all! Here's a little deal news to put on your radar:

  • T-Mobile Home Internet is officially official now, and after six weeks of using the service, I have a lot to say about it. Stay tuned!
  • Shopping for an affordable office chair? I put my butt on half a dozen of them, all priced under $100. Any winners in the group? Find out this Saturday.

Today I bring you significant savings on a mechanical keyboard (they're a thing now, who knew?), massage gun and 3D printer. Want more deals? Sign up for Cheapskate text alerts

As always, everything here is available for a limited time and while supplies last. Every coupon and code was tested and working at the time of this writing.

Rantopad

In the old days I used a mechanical keyboard. Then I grudgingly switched to the low-profile keyboards we all use now. Then I learned (just recently) that mechanical keyboards have made a huge comeback, and they're, like, a thing. Different switches, custom keys, LED lighting... one CNET writer likened modern mechanical keyboards to custom lightsabers.

Anyway, the Rantopad MXX originally sold for $100 (and it's currently $90 at Amazon), but UntilGone's exclusive deal gets you out the door for $35 with promo code CNETMXX. It features blue switches (that means something, apparently) and various LED lighting patterns.

Me, I no longer miss the loud clacking of keyboards like this. But, wow, some folks are definitely drinking the Kool-Aid.

Aerlang

Amazon seller: FUTIN

Price: $30 with promo code PJ4BENIE

Another day, another impossibly good deal on a massage gun. Aerlang's full-size model features a brushless motor, six heads and a carrying case.

The battery is good for up to six hours, according to Aerlang, though obviously that depends on which of the gun's 20 (!) massage speeds you're using.

This model also touts a 16mm stroke length, which is higher than most and promises a deeper massage. Just note that at 2.2 pounds, it's also heavier than most.

Creality

I recently tested an entry-level Creality 3D printer, one I found challenging for three reasons: Difficult to assemble, difficult to level and unintuitive to operate. Kinda wish I'd waited for this deal to come along (though at the time I didn't know this model existed).

The CR-6 SE comes mostly assembled. It requires no leveling (or, rather, it handles it on its own) and employs a much more intuitive touchscreen interface. Although it apparently achieved some Kickstarter notoriety (and not in a good way), the finished product is, from what I can tell, a winner.

It normally sells for $400, and in fact that's the price I'm seeing pretty much everywhere, but at Tomtop promo code CNETSE knocks it down to $265 -- and it ships from a US warehouse, not China.

One thing to note: Once you get to checkout, you have to actually select the items in your cart before you see the total price. It's a little weird. But then you can add the promo code and you should be good to go.

See anything you like? 😜


CNET's Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow him on Facebook and Twitter. You can also sign up for deal texts delivered right to your phone. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest Walmart discount codeseBay couponsSamsung promo codes and even more from hundreds of other online stores. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Answers live on our FAQ page.

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Microsoft Paint could finally be moving to the Microsoft Store – CNET

"We still [heart] MS Paint"

Microsoft Paint could get new life in the Microsoft Store.

Microsoft

For fans of Microsoft Paint, their artistic visions won't have to languish much longer. The once popular program for drawing and painting, which made its debut with Windows 1.0 in 1985, could finally be moving to the Microsoft Store

In a blog post announcing the Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 21354, Microsoft said MSPaint will be "updateable via the Microsoft Store outside major OS updates."

In 2017, Microsoft said Paint would be available through the Microsoft Store, instead of as part of its OS. The company backed away from that somewhat and left the program in Windows 10 for several years. Now it finally appears the move is happening.

Microsoft didn't immediately respond to a request for comment as to when Paint will be available to all. 

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The Best Theragun to Buy (and Other Great Massage Guns)

Massage guns, or percussive therapy devices, help relax and sooth sore muscles, whether you’re an athlete or just hunching over a desk all day. 

Theraguns (made by Therabody) tend to be the best massage guns. We’ve tested a bunch of the newest models, and several of the more affordable alternatives available. Our favorites are below, along with what we learned speaking to a physical therapist and athletic trainer to see what exactly these devices are doing.

Updated April 2021: We’ve added Therabody’s three Wave Series roller devices, plus the SKG F5, an alternative massager with heat. 

Medea Giordano is the lead reviewer for this guide. Jess Grey and Julian Chokkattu also tested some devices.

Special offer for Gear readers: Get a 1-year subscription to WIRED for $5 ($25 off). This includes unlimited access to WIRED.com and our print magazine (if you’d like). Subscriptions help fund the work we do every day.

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Samsung’s new SmartTag+ uses augmented reality to help you find your keys – CNET

Samsung Galaxy SmartTag
Samsung

Samsung has announced it will launch its new SmartTag Plus globally on April 16, with US availability to follow "in the coming weeks." The SmartTag Plus is a newer version of the $30 SmartTag, a device that helps users find lost items, such as keys.

The SmartTag Plus uses Bluetooth and ultra wideband technology to locate items the tag is connected to. Then, with augmented reality technology using phone cameras, the SmartThings Find service on Galaxy devices will visually guide users to their lost items.

galaxy-smarttag-kv-low-res

The SmartThings Find feature on Samsung Galaxy devices will help guide users to their lost items using an augmented reality feature.

Samsung

Samsung didn't announce a price for the SmartTag Plus, and didn't immediately respond to a request for that information.

See also: Samsung Galaxy S21's three models compared: S21 vs. S21 Plus vs. S21 Ultra

Now playing: Watch this: We review the Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G and its bonkers cameras

9:22

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NXT TakeOver Stand and Deliver Night 2: How to watch, start times and match card – CNET

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WWE

The first night of NXT TakeOver: Stand and Deliver is in the books. We have a new NXT Women's Champion, new NXT Tag Team Champions, and we got to see a classic in Walter versus Tommaso Ciampa. The second night, which airs on Thursday night, has a high bar to clear -- but it certainly has to potential to do so. 

Night 1 of Stand and Deliver aired on both the USA Network and Peacock. Night 2 is different, as it's exclusively broadcasting from Peacock

How to Watch on Peacock

You won't be able to watch the show on the WWE Network unless you live outside of the US. If you're in the US, you'll need to sign up to NBC's Peacock to watch Stand and Deliver Night 2 -- as well as WrestleMania. WWE has effectively deactivated the Network in the US, and from now on all pay-per-view events stream from Peacock. You can't switch membership, so you'll need to sign up for Peacock Premium ($5 a month). Find out more here.

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Walter versus Ciampa at Night 1 of Stand and Deliver. 

WWE

Start times

NXT TakeOver: Stand and Deliver Night 2 airs at 5 p.m. PT/8 p.m ET exclusively on Peacock, on Thursday, April 8.

Wrestling fans across the pond will have to stay up late, as the shows start at midnight UK time. Audiences Down Under will need to carve out some of their 9-to-5 to watch the show, as it airs at 10 a.m AEST. Viewers in both regions can watch NXT TakeOver on the WWE Network, which still works like it always has outside of the US.

Match card

NXT TakeOver: Stand and Deliver Night 2

  • NXT Championship: Finn Balor vs. Karrion Kross.
  • Unsanctioned match: Adam Cole vs. Kyle O'Reilly. 
  • NXT North American Championship: Johnny Gargano vs. Bronson Reed.
  • NXT Cruiserweight Championship ladder match: Jordan Devlin vs. Santos Escobar.
  • NXT Women's Championship match: Ember Moon and Shotzi Blackheart (c) vs. The Way.

NXT TakeOver: Stand and Deliver Night 1 results

  • Raquel Gonzalez defeats Io Shirai for NXT Women's Championship.
  • Walter pins Tommaso Ciampa to retain NXT UK Championship.
  • Pete Dunne beat Kushida.
  • MSK won triple threat tag team title match
  • Bronson Reed earned shot at North American Championship by winning six-man gauntlet match. 

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How to Customize Your PS5’s Home Screen

Unfortunately, that’s all this screen allows for—there are no folders, no manual sorting, and it won’t even save your sorting settings. If you leave this screen and come back, it’ll be set to Most Recent again (why, Sony, why?). Still, if you’re looking for a game you haven’t played in a while—or ever—it could help you find it faster. You can also press Triangle from the home screen to jump to the search button, which is handy.

Customize the Control Center

When you press the PS button on the PlayStation 5, you’ll see the Control Center, which includes cards that act as shortcuts and information for the current game, as well as a set of quick menus along the bottom. You can access your notifications, friends, sound options, and more.

If you find this menu cluttered with options you’ll never use—or if you want to enable some hidden ones—you can customize it to your liking. Highlight one of the shortcuts along the bottom of the screen, then press the Options button on your controller. You’ll see a list of all the icons that can live here. Some are permanent, but others can be removed and added to make the menu more applicable to your needs.

Oh, and bonus tip: if you’d rather the Control Center not appear at all, you can hold the PS button down to go straight back to the home screen.

Turn Off the Background Music and Sound Effects

I always kind of dug the soothing background tones of modern video game consoles, but some may not. And the PS5 doesn’t just play calming music in the background—it plays different music based on whatever game you highlight, which can be annoying.

Thankfully, you can turn this music—and the associated sound effects—off completely. Highlight the Settings cog in the upper right corner of the home screen, then head to Sound > Audio Output and scroll down to the bottom of the menu. You’ll see an option to turn off the Home Screen Music and Sound Effects, if you so choose.

Tweak the UI With Accessibility Settings

While Accessibility settings are designed with differently-abled people in mind, they can also provide handy customizations you might have missed (like turning off the butt-dialing tap-to-wake feature on iPhones). If you head to Settings > Accessibility, you’ll find a few options under Display that may interest you—like customizing the way text appears or changing the scroll speed of overflow text.

Disable Popup Notifications

Finally, while it isn’t specific to the home screen, I recommend heading to Settings > Notifications and customizing how and when pop-ups appear. Many notifications may be set to hide during videos and broadcasts, but that means when you go back to the home screen, you’ll often get spammed with notifications you missed. You can turn certain notifications off entirely, or set them to display for a shorter amount of time, so they aren’t hanging out on your screen, covering up those all-important icons in the corner.

I wish we had more useful options, and using the PS5 side by side with other consoles really makes the interface feel unfinished. Hopefully, as Sony releases more software updates for the machine, more of those useful sorting and customization features will trickle out over time—so you can make your console truly yours.


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My Dream of the Great Unbundling

Lately I’ve taken greatly to this epaper tablet, the ReMarkable 2. I’m not sure who sells it. Not Apple or Amazon. It’s slower and monochrome and less powerful than my iPad, but somehow its duller, paperlike screen and its simple software encourage me to scribble, and I’ve been using it to write weird calligraphic notes that I send to my friends. Sometimes I prepare presentations with it, in cursive, and use them when I’m on a video call in lieu of PowerPoint. It doesn’t glow or read email, and I delight in that.

As I doodle in the sunlight, my Roomba bumps my foot. The children have named it Biscuit. You can connect to it via an app, but lately I just hit its big dumb button, and it does its thing (vacuuming). Upstairs my $35 Raspberry Pi computer, running software called Pi-hole, has blocked 97,000 ads from our home network. I am making oatmeal on the stove, my phone is somewhere, charging, and all is well with the world. I’ve been thinking, idly, of installing a landline. Not a real one. A Wi-Fi one. I’m sure I could power it with another Raspberry Pi.

You know the story: The web shows up in the 1990s. It’s totally decentralized. Everyone can participate if they can learn HTML. But the platform companies, like Google and Amazon, come along, start to command more and more attention, and take a huge helping of the advertising pie (there was pie?) until only a few megaplatforms matter. And the way you access those platforms is from your phone, which can send emails, order food, call cars, and take pictures—and now check your heart and respiratory rate, or encourage you to walk more until you close your circles. The amount of power this concentrates into a few companies has led to perpetual congressional hearings. We live with it.

It’s hard to talk about these companies. They’re enormous and complex. But there’s also a paradox built into tech culture: We’re supposed to celebrate scale, while using every possible tool to destroy the incumbents. So you end up feeling as if you should somehow worship these giants and fear their power and size and ability to innovate—and sure, the Apple M1 rollout is for the ages—but at the same time there’s a cultural imperative to smash them, using any (digital) means necessary. We must disrupt the enemy, who is us.

But how? By making new internets, but guaranteed decentralized this time. We’ll use open protocols, like Mastodon, the Twitter anyone can self-host! Or maybe the answer is to make a globe-spanning network of redundant files, using IPFS. Let’s create our own currencies, like Ethereum, to support dapps (decentralized apps) that run on … ETH gas? Whatever, NFTs! Build a new browser! Everyone who writes code on the weekends eventually thinks to themselves, You know, if things bend my way, I think I’ve got the next Facebook. Even if it’s a site that makes animated kittens dance. There’s always that little parsley sprig of hope in the mashed potatoes of your side projects.

But this is fantasy, because giant companies are not going to be disrupted anytime soon. They can afford to buy any threat. And they are built to survive. In 50 years Amazon will be using drones to deliver your denture cream. Apple will be building trains. Facebook will take over the national telecommunications grid in 20 distressed nations and call it the F20.

They aren’t immortal, of course. All giants fade away. Look at Sears, look at AT&T. Microsoft is 46, but why won’t it make it to 90? We will all probably die before Google does. Every single human reading this will live out the remainder of their life in between product launch events held at Apple Park in the Steve Jobs Theater. People will read our funeral announcements on Facebook and add little sobbies.

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