Even car thieves are over sedans and coupes, now targeting full-size trucks – Roadshow

97accord-v6-lxsedan-source

The fifth-generation Honda Accord my be the oldest car on the list, and likely the model on the list for the longest, but its place is slipping.

Honda

It's probably fair to assume that when you -- or most people, really -- think about the most stolen cars in America, you probably picture clapped-out 1990s Hondas and Toyotas. While that certainly was the case for a long time -- partly due to the cars' popularity and partly because, let's face it, they were easy to steal -- that isn't the case anymore.

Want proof? Well, the National Insurance Crime Bureau has just published its annual Hot Wheels report on Tuesday that details not only the make and model of the most stolen cars overall but also the year and which cars are the most stolen in a particular state. So, what makes the top of the list for 2019?

In a move that surprised the hell out of us, the most stolen vehicle in America is now the 2006 Ford full-size pickup (think your F-150 and Super-Duty models). This makes a lot of sense on a few levels. First, the F-150 is the best-selling vehicle in the country by a large margin, so like those '90s Hondas, there are plenty of victims to choose from. Next, trucks' and SUVs' popularity has likely trickled down to the illicit used parts business, making coupes and sedans less popular targets.

ford-f-150-fx4-09-07-2009

It's now open season on the mid-aughts version of the Ford F-series pickups, so don't get too attached to yours, friend.

IFCAR via Wikipedia

OK, but what other vehicles are on the list? Well, somewhat unsurprisingly, the 1997 Honda Accord is still on there, which represents both impressive staying power and a shocking lack of resistance to automotive malfeasance. It's way down at no. 4, though. No. 2 on the list is also a Honda -- the 2000 Honda Civic. No. 3 is the 2004 Chevrolet full-size pickups. Rounding out the top five is the 2007 Toyota Camry.

Now, as we get a little deeper into the top 10, things get more interesting. Specifically with the vehicles in seventh and ninth place -- the 2018 Toyota Corolla and the 2018 GMC full-size truck, respectively. One would think that over the past few decades, cars have gotten much harder to steal, but that may not be as much the case as we'd previously imagined.

So what can you do as an owner of one of these models? Well, beyond not getting overly emotionally attached, you can make sure you park in well-lit and highly trafficked areas or inside in a secure garage. It's all about making the theft as inconvenient as possible for your would-be car thief.

If you're interested in checking out the top models stolen in your particular state, NICB has you covered, too (PDF). It's published the results of its 2019 model year study on its website.

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Even car thieves are over sedans and coupes, now targeting full-size trucks – Roadshow

97accord-v6-lxsedan-source

The fifth-generation Honda Accord my be the oldest car on the list, and likely the model on the list for the longest, but its place is slipping.

Honda

It's probably fair to assume that when you -- or most people, really -- think about the most stolen cars in America, you probably picture clapped-out 1990s Hondas and Toyotas. While that certainly was the case for a long time -- partly due to the cars' popularity and partly because, let's face it, they were easy to steal -- that isn't the case anymore.

Want proof? Well, the National Insurance Crime Bureau has just published its annual Hot Wheels report on Tuesday that details not only the make and model of the most stolen cars overall but also the year and which cars are the most stolen in a particular state. So, what makes the top of the list for 2019?

In a move that surprised the hell out of us, the most stolen vehicle in America is now the 2006 Ford full-size pickup (think your F-150 and Super-Duty models). This makes a lot of sense on a few levels. First, the F-150 is the best-selling vehicle in the country by a large margin, so like those '90s Hondas, there are plenty of victims to choose from. Next, trucks' and SUVs' popularity has likely trickled down to the illicit used parts business, making coupes and sedans less popular targets.

ford-f-150-fx4-09-07-2009

It's now open season on the mid-aughts version of the Ford F-series pickups, so don't get too attached to yours, friend.

IFCAR via Wikipedia

OK, but what other vehicles are on the list? Well, somewhat unsurprisingly, the 1997 Honda Accord is still on there, which represents both impressive staying power and a shocking lack of resistance to automotive malfeasance. It's way down at no. 4, though. No. 2 on the list is also a Honda -- the 2000 Honda Civic. No. 3 is the 2004 Chevrolet full-size pickups. Rounding out the top five is the 2007 Toyota Camry.

Now, as we get a little deeper into the top 10, things get more interesting. Specifically with the vehicles in seventh and ninth place -- the 2018 Toyota Corolla and the 2018 GMC full-size truck, respectively. One would think that over the past few decades, cars have gotten much harder to steal, but that may not be as much the case as we'd previously imagined.

So what can you do as an owner of one of these models? Well, beyond not getting overly emotionally attached, you can make sure you park in well-lit and highly trafficked areas or inside in a secure garage. It's all about making the theft as inconvenient as possible for your would-be car thief.

If you're interested in checking out the top models stolen in your particular state, NICB has you covered, too (PDF). It's published the results of its 2019 model year study on its website.

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Trial of the Chicago 7: Aaron Sorkin takes a timely look at the power of protest – CNET

c7-04035r

From left, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Ben Shenkman, Mark Rylance, Eddie Redmayne and Alex Sharp in The Trial of the Chicago 7 on Netflix. 

Netflix

The Trial of the Chicago 7, written and directed by Aaron Sorkin, is a 1960s history lesson that reverberates powerfully today. Focusing on the fight for civil rights, it explores how certain freedoms can never be taken for granted (certainly not in 2020).

The movie, streaming on Netflix now, assembles a top-tier ensemble cast, retelling the true story of a political trial whose defendants, antiwar activists, faced the possibility of a 10-year sentence because of their ideas. 

The Trial of the Chicago 7 features all the Sorkinisms associated with the creator of The West Wing. There's fast-paced repartee, and long, brilliant monologues in which characters romanticize political ideals. 

During a rapid succession of Sorkinian sequences in which characters can't stop talking while they're walking, the movie introduces its main players while cutting to archival footage. We see imagery of President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Vietnam draft; Martin Luther King -- his opposition to the war, and his murder; Robert Kennedy's assassination; activist groups vocally opposing the war.

c7-06988-r2

Sacha Baron Cohen, left, and Jeremy Strong.

Netflix

"Martin (Luther King) is dead. Malcolm (X) is dead. Medgar (Evers) is dead. Bobby (Kennedy) is dead. Jesus is dead. They tried it peacefully, we gonna try something else," says Black Panther Party co-founder Bobby Seale (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) at the beginning of the film. He's going to the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago to protest the war.

Seale isn't the only one heading to Chicago with that in mind. So are Tom Hayden (Eddie Redmayne) and Rennie Davis (Alex Sharp), two leaders of Students for a Democratic Society. There's also David Dellinger (John Carroll Lynch), from Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam, and decided nonconformists Abbie Hoffman (Sacha Baron Cohen) and Jerry Rubin (Jeremy Strong) from the Youth International Party (the Yippies). They all want to march and oppose Democratic presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey, who isn't antiwar. But protests end in clashes with police and the National Guard. The organizers are charged with conspiracy to incite a riot.

The film introduces viewers to each of those real people with their names shown on screen when the characters first appear. The movie juxtaposes the court proceedings in 1969, when Richard Nixon was president, with the events of the summer of 1968 that led to the trial.

The recent Black Lives Matter protests and demands for racial and social justice make this film essential viewing. The Trial of the Chicago 7 is timely because of the era it depicts, but it's not the only film revisiting this time period in the United States. Others include the documentary MLK/FBI; the Regina King-directed movie One Night in Miami; and Judas and the Black Messiah, which recounts the 1969 police killing of Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panthers. 

A surprise in The Trial of the Chicago 7 is Borat comedian Cohen's performance. He's clearly having fun, sporting the unruly hair and unkempt clothes of a hippie who doesn't respect authority yet doesn't take himself too seriously. Cohen plays the juicy part with the right amount of rakishness -- the British actor has some of the best lines in the movie, and delivers them with the colorful New England accent his character had in real life.

Lines like: "I've never been on trial for my thoughts before" or "the institutions of our democracy are wonderful things that right now are populated by some terrible people." But my favorite Cohen/Hoffman moment takes place when the judge (played by Frank Langella, looking like he'd be perfectly at ease in an episode of The Good Fight) asks him if he's familiar with the term "contempt of court." To which Cohen's character replies: "It's practically a religion to me, sir."

c7-03285-r2

Director Aaron Sorkin on the set of The Trial of the Chicago 7.

Netflix

In an ensemble populated by more big names, like Michael Keaton and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, other standout performers include Abdul-Mateen and Academy Award-winner Redmayne. He plays polished student leader Hayden with a magnetism I wasn't aware he possessed. Abdul-Mateen, fresh from his Emmy win in Watchmen, is at the center of an especially uncomfortable sequence in which his character is gagged and viciously mistreated. The Trial of the Chicago 7 touches on the fact that Abdul-Mateen's character was the only Black person on trial, exposing how differently he was handled.

My only objection is the lack of substantial female characters. This isn't unusual for Sorkin, who almost makes it look here like men were the only ones fighting for civil rights in the '60s. I'm sure that for this story Sorkin could've found a good C.J. Cregg-type character -- The West Wing's talented press secretary turned chief of staff (played by Allison Janney).

"I want to bring back manners. How about that? The America I grew up in," US Attorney General John Mitchell (John Doman), who served under Nixon, says at the start of The Trial of the Chicago 7. Sorkin makes a point that some things haven't changed all that much since 1969.

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Trial of the Chicago 7 review: Aaron Sorkin takes timely look at the power of protest – CNET

c7-04035r

From left, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Ben Shenkman, Mark Rylance, Eddie Redmayne and Alex Sharp in The Trial of the Chicago 7 on Netflix. 

Netflix

The Trial of the Chicago 7, written and directed by Aaron Sorkin for Netflix, is a timely history lesson that reverberates powerfully today. Focusing on the fight for civil rights in the 1960s, it explores how certain freedoms can never be taken for granted (certainly not in 2020).

Streaming Oct. 16, the movie assembles a top-tier ensemble cast, retelling the true story of a political trial whose defendants, antiwar activists, faced the possibility of a 10-year sentence because of their ideas. 

The Trial of the Chicago 7 features all the Sorkinisms associated with the creator of The West Wing. There's fast-paced repartee, and long, brilliant monologues in which characters romanticize political ideals. 

During a rapid succession of Sorkinian sequences in which characters can't stop talking while they're walking, the movie introduces its main players while cutting to archival footage. We see imagery of President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Vietnam draft; Martin Luther King -- his opposition to the war, and his murder; Robert Kennedy's assassination; activist groups vocally opposing the war.

c7-06988-r2

Sacha Baron Cohen, left, and Jeremy Strong.

Netflix

"Martin (Luther King) is dead. Malcolm (X) is dead. Medgar (Evers) is dead. Bobby (Kennedy) is dead. Jesus is dead. They tried it peacefully, we gonna try something else," says Black Panther Party co-founder Bobby Seale (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) at the beginning of the film. He's going to the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago to protest the war.

Seale isn't the only one heading to Chicago with that in mind. So are Tom Hayden (Eddie Redmayne) and Rennie Davis (Alex Sharp), two leaders of Students for a Democratic Society. There's also David Dellinger (John Carroll Lynch), from Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam, and decided nonconformists Abbie Hoffman (Sacha Baron Cohen) and Jerry Rubin (Jeremy Strong) from the Youth International Party (the Yippies). They all want to march and oppose Democratic presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey, who isn't antiwar. But protests end in clashes with police and the National Guard. The organizers are charged with conspiracy to incite a riot.

The film introduces viewers to each of those real people with their names shown on screen when the characters first appear. The movie juxtaposes the court proceedings in 1969, when Richard Nixon was president, with the events of the summer of 1968 that led to the trial.

The recent Black Lives Matter protests and demands for racial and social justice make this film essential viewing. The Trial of the Chicago 7 is timely because of the era it depicts, but it's not the only film revisiting this time period in the United States. Others include the documentary MLK/FBI; the Regina King-directed movie One Night in Miami; and Judas and the Black Messiah, which recounts the 1969 police killing of Fred Hampton, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panthers. 

A surprise in The Trial of the Chicago 7 is Borat comedian Cohen's performance. He's clearly having fun, sporting the unruly hair and unkempt clothes of a hippie who doesn't respect authority yet doesn't take himself too seriously. Cohen plays the juicy part with the right amount of rakishness -- the British actor has some of the best lines in the movie, and delivers them with the colorful New England accent his character had in real life.

Lines like: "I've never been on trial for my thoughts before" or "the institutions of our democracy are wonderful things that right now are populated by some terrible people." But my favorite Cohen/Hoffman moment takes place when the judge (played by Frank Langella, looking like he'd be perfectly at ease in an episode of The Good Fight) asks him if he's familiar with the term "contempt of court." To which Cohen's character replies: "It's practically a religion to me, sir."

c7-03285-r2

Director Aaron Sorkin on the set of The Trial of the Chicago 7.

Netflix

In an ensemble populated by more big names, like Michael Keaton and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, other standout performers include Abdul-Mateen and Academy Award-winner Redmayne. He plays polished student leader Hayden with a magnetism I wasn't aware he possessed. Abdul-Mateen, fresh from his Emmy win in Watchmen, is at the center of an especially uncomfortable sequence in which his character is gagged and viciously mistreated. The Trial of the Chicago 7 touches on the fact that Abdul-Mateen's character was the only Black person on trial, exposing how differently he was handled.

My only objection is the lack of substantial female characters. This isn't unusual for Sorkin, who almost makes it look here like men were the only ones fighting for civil rights in the '60s. I'm sure that for this story Sorkin could've found a good C.J. Cregg-type character -- The West Wing's talented press secretary turned chief of staff (played by Allison Janney).

"I want to bring back manners. How about that? The America I grew up in," US Attorney General John Mitchell (John Doman), who served under Nixon, says at the start of The Trial of the Chicago 7. Sorkin makes a point that some things haven't changed all that much since 1969.

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QAnon: What you need to know as this unhinged, pro-Trump conspiracy theory grows – CNET

QAnon

QAnon followers continue to grow in numbers. 

Getty Images

QAnon, a conspiracy theory that began on anonymous message boards and believes US President Donald Trump is fighting a battle against evil, has jumped from the online world to everyday life. Now the broad and baseless hoax is influencing politics, with dozens of congressional candidates professing belief in a cabal of Satanist Democrats, child-trafficking elite and a deep state determined to topple the president. Just to be absolutely clear: These are bogus claims. 

The conspiracy theory appears to have started in 2017 when an online poster using the handle "Q" claimed ties to President Donald Trump. Other conspiracy theorists found and amplified Q's posts, known as Q drops, expanding the audience for the cryptic messages. Three years on, QAnon continues to grow at a quick clip, and the FBI says it poses a threat to the nation. 

Understanding QAnon requires a look at where the conspiracy theory started, what its followers believe and how it's provoked acts of violence in the real world. The hoax has troubled lawmakers enough to prompt a bipartisan resolution condemning it.

Here's what you need to know about the weird world of QAnon.

QAnon sounds wild. What can you tell me about it? 

QAnon is an online conspiracy theory that claims Trump is waging a secret war against a deep state of Democratic elites and Hollywood stars who are pedophiles and Satan worshipers. Cannibalism is in there someplace too. Really, that's what they believe. 

The conspiracy theory dates back to October 2017, when an anonymous post on a message board said extradition agreements had been struck with several countries "in case of cross border run" by Hillary Clinton, Trump's Democratic rival for the White House in 2016. (That run still hasn't happened.) The person or group behind the post eventually came to be known as "Q," which is where the conspiracy theory's name comes from. 

The first QAnon post. 

Archive.4plebs.org

Since then, the conspiracy theory has gotten wider and weirder. It's now folded in former President Barack Obama and billionaire philanthropist George Soros, both of whom, among other well-known figures, are frequent subjects of online conspiracy theories.

By the way, Q is a reference to the highest security level clearance at the Department of Energy. That's the department that oversees nuclear weapons. Q claims to work in close proximity to Trump and the inner circle of his administration. 

Does anyone know who Q is?

Other than Q, not that we know of. 

Of course, more than one person has claimed to be Q, with one theory saying the mysterious figure is a time traveler. (Even some QAnon followers, who've proved they'll believe just about anything, think that's a bit too crazy.)

Paul Furber, a conspiracy theorist from Johannesburg, has been identified as possibly being the original Q poster because of an appearance he made on the Alex Jones-hosted InfoWars TV show a few months after the first post. The appearance on the conspiracy-minded program, which has a following among Trump supporters, was key to bringing QAnon from online message boards to a more mainstream audience. 

Jim Watkins, the owner of the 8kun message board, is another person often speculated to be Q because Q's posts migrated to his site not long after they first appeared. Fredrick Brennan, who created the predecessor of 8kun, says the board's authentication system could prove who's posting the messages, even though the service is supposed to be anonymous.

Neither Furber nor Watkins responded to requests for comment. Neither has made a public statement about possible involvement in the conspiracy theory, though Watkins was responsible for creating the QAnon SuperPAC

How has QAnon jumped from online to the real world? 

Since Furber appeared on InfoWars, Q followers have taken to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and even TikTok to generate huge followings with their attempts to decipher the arcane messages. Q followers, who refer to themselves as "anons," are regulars at Trump rallies, even though they get turned away by security. They've also formed their own rallies with the message of "#SaveTheChildren," co-opting a hashtag used by legitimate organizations combating child trafficking.

The fanaticism over QAnon has also fostered criminal acts. In June 2018, a Q follower blocked traffic on the Hoover Dam with an armored vehicle before being apprehended by police. He pleaded guilty to terrorism charges this past February. A man accused of killing a New York mob boss in March 2019 identified himself as a follower, displaying the letter Q drawn on his palm in court. His lawyer said he was fascinated with QAnon, and other far-right conspiracy theories, and he was later found unfit to stand trial. Multiple women who identify as Q followers face charges for kidnapping their own children, believing that they're saving the youngsters from trafficking.

The concern has grown so great that the FBI said last year that the movement represented a domestic terrorist threat. The House of Representatives also condemned the unhinged theory, though a handful of lawmakers voted against the resolution.

Nonetheless, the popularity and influence of the conspiracy theory continue to grow. Dozens of self-identified QAnon believers are running for office in the coming election. Jo Rae Perkins, a Senate candidate from Oregon, tweeted a message that included #WWG1WGA, an abbreviation of the expression, "where we go one, we go all," that's commonly used among QAnon followers. (The tweet is no longer available on Twitter, but it's been archived on the Wayback Machine.) "My support of Q is no different than my support of any other person or group of persons who exercise their First Amendment Rights, Freedom of the Press and Freedom of Speech," Perkins told CNET in a statement.

Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Georgia Republican who is running for a House seat, called Q "a patriot" in a nearly 30-minute video that focussed on the conspiracy theory. Trump has said she is a "future Republican star" on Twitter. The president has regularly retweeted accounts of Q followers. 

Are social media and tech companies doing anything about QAnon?

Like a lot of fringe ideologies, QAnon spreads quickest on social media. The YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and TikTok platforms have all played an important role in expanding the number of QAnon followers. 

Social media companies are aware and have begun to take action. 

In August, Facebook removed or demoted thousands of QAnon groups and pages after an internal investigation found they were violating its policies. The company also removed thousands of QAnon accounts from Instagram. Facebook ramped up its response on Oct. 6 saying it will remove all Facebook pages, groups and Instagram accounts representing QAnon

Twitter began cracking down on QAnon accounts in July. It removed thousands of accounts that tweeted about the movement, though some have since restarted under different names. That same month, TikTok began banning QAnon-related hashtags, making videos harder to find on the platform.

And YouTube said moderation policies implemented earlier this year have reduced the views of QAnon videos by 70%. On Thursday, the video platform stepped up enforcement of its policies, as it began banning videos featuring the conspiracy theory

Reddit has also taken steps to curb the reach of QAnon posts and subreddits.

LinkedIn, the social media platform focused on professional networking, isn't a stranger to QAnon. Users began posting misinformation and filling their profiles with QAnon slogans, which led to a crackdown by the site. 

Pinterest began its crackdown on QAnon content in August 2018. A spokesperson for the company says it also disabled search results for anything related to the conspiracy theory. 

Triller is a TikTok alternative growing in popularity, and it began banning QAnon-related videos. 

"In light of the recent addition by the FBI of QAnon to its list of terrorist activity, we have initiated a ban of QAnon content," company CEO Mike Lu said in an emailed statement Wednesday. "We are a platform that believes in freedom of speech, expression, open discussion and freedom of opinion, however when the government classifies something as a terrorist threat, we must take action to protect our community."

The e-commerce site Etsy cracked down on QAnon according to a report from Business Insider on Oct. 7. The company says it will remove any merchandise related to the fringe movement. 

Even the fitness-tech company Peloton intervened when customers began using QAnon-related hashtags, according to a report by Busines Insider. Tags such as #SaveTheChildren, #Q and #WWGOnePelotonWGA showed up on Peloton machines, allowing users to find other Q followers.

"We have a zero tolerance policy against hateful content. We actively moderate our channels and remove anything that violates our policy or does not reflect our company's values of inclusiveness and unity or maintain a respectful environment," a Peloton spokesperson told CNET in an email. The QAnon hashtags have since been removed from the platform. 

OK, I have to ask: What are some of the other wacky ideas QAnon followers believe? 

Are you sure you want to know? Keep in mind these ideas are completely baseless. 

The core belief is that Trump is working to remove Satanic criminals inside the government, the Democratic Party and Hollywood.

Followers believe notable members of the Democratic party and the Hollywood elite operate pedophile rings. Tom Hanks, Oprah Winfrey and Ellen Degeneres are baselessly named as being participants. (CNET didn't contact any of the stars for comment because the accusations are bogus.)

One of the wackier strains of QAnon is the belief that John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of late President John F. Kennedy, is still alive. (Kennedy Jr. died in a 1999 plane crash.) Not only do Q adherents think he's still alive, they say he'll be announced as Trump's running mate later this month. Never mind that current Vice President Mike Pence is already on the ticket.

QAnon also ropes in a host of other popular conspiracy theories, including flat Earth and anti-vax. Believers have been at the forefront of misinformation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. Among their ideas: the Chinese government created the virus, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates will use the pandemic to microchip Americans, and the pandemic is a hoax designed to sink Trump's reelection.

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Volvo Smart Garage – Roadshow

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Roadshow and Smart Home team up for a series of videos about PHEVs, presented by Volvo.
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Image of tree-hugging Russian tiger tops wildlife photography winners – CNET

tiger-winner.png

Sergey Gorshkov's winning image shows an Amur tigress hugging an ancient Manchurian fir in the Russian Far East.

Sergey Gorshov/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

A dreamy looking Amur tigress rubbing her cheek against an ancient Manchurian fir in the Russian Far East captured top honors in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest, held annually by London's Natural History Museum. It took Russian photographer Sergey Gorshkov more than 11 months to capture the moment, using hidden cameras. The tigress is marking her territory by leaving behind secretions from her scent glands.

"It's a scene like no other, a unique glimpse of an intimate moment deep in a magical forest," said Roz Kidman Cox, chair of the judging panel. 

The Duchess of Cambridge announced the winner in a ceremony live-streamed on Tuesday.

Liina Heikkinen of Finland won Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year for her dramatic image of a young fox refusing to share the barnacle goose it holds in its jaws. 

Some images catch animals in their natural habitat, but others focus on exploitation of animals by humans. One shows a muzzled polar bear performing in a Russian traveling circus, while another shows three tigers rescued from the Oklahoma animal park once owned by Joe Exotic, whose story was told in the popular Netflix series Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness.

"There has never been a more vital time for audiences all over the world to reengage with the natural world," said Tim Littlewood, the museum's executive director of science, "and what better way than this inspiring and provocative exhibition?"

Photographers submitted almost 50,000 entries this year. The photographs will be exhibited at the London museum from Oct. 16 through June 6, 2021, and then will embark on a UK and international tour. The next competition, the 57th annual, will open for entries Oct. 19, and close for entries on Dec. 10. It is open to photographers of all ages and abilities.

In 2019, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year award went to Chinese photographer Yongqing Bao for a photo showing a Tibetan fox about to lunge at a startled marmot. The marmot did not survive the encounter.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London. 

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Amazon’s new AR app unlocks Halloween fun on your shipping boxes – CNET

amazon-ar

Amazon is getting spooky with its new AR app. 

Amazon/Screenshot by Shelby Brown/CNET

If you're like me and are terrible about getting rid of shipping boxes, your hoarding tendencies could finally come in handy. Amazon released a new augmented reality app that creates "interactive, shareable" experiences when you use your phone's camera to scan the QR code on the Amazon box. The free app is called Amazon Augmented Reality. 

"The activity on our Halloween-themed boxes is a great way to reuse boxes before dropping them in the recycling bin, and they underscore our commitment to sustainability," Vas Obeyesekere, senior industrial designer with Amazon's sustainability team, told CNET in a statement.

amazon-ar-2

Here's a look at what you can do with Amazon Augmented Reality. 

Amazon/Screenshot by Shelby Brown/CNET

The app's screenshots in the App Store show that boxes might offer different activities. Scanning the QR code could make a little AR corgi dog jump out to play, or turn your shipping box into an AR car. There's also an option to color a face on a preprinted white pumpkin, scan it and watch it appear in AR. 

Here's a look at what Amazon Augmented Reality can do: 

Amazon Augmented Reality is available in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. It's designed to specifically work with Amazon boxes, but you can test the feature (without a box) on Amazon's website. 

The boxes have started shipping in the US and will circulate for a limited time, but customers can keep using them past Halloween, according to the company. 

This isn't the first time Amazon has tried to get creative with its boxes. The tech giant previously released directions to reuse your boxes by building a cat condo, a rocket ship, a robot costume, a car, a fort or a windmill for mini golf. 

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Amazon’s new AR app unlocks Halloween fun on your shipping boxes – CNET

amazon-ar

Amazon is getting spooky with its new AR app. 

Amazon/Screenshot by Shelby Brown/CNET

If you're like me and are terrible about getting rid of shipping boxes, your hoarding tendencies could finally come in handy. Amazon released a new augmented reality app that creates "interactive, shareable" experiences when you use your phone's camera to scan the QR code on the Amazon box. The free app is called Amazon Augmented Reality. 

"The activity on our Halloween-themed boxes is a great way to reuse boxes before dropping them in the recycling bin, and they underscore our commitment to sustainability," Vas Obeyesekere, senior industrial designer with Amazon's sustainability team, told CNET in a statement.

amazon-ar-2

Here's a look at what you can do with Amazon Augmented Reality. 

Amazon/Screenshot by Shelby Brown/CNET

The app's screenshots in the App Store show that boxes might offer different activities. Scanning the QR code could make a little AR corgi dog jump out to play, or turn your shipping box into an AR car. There's also an option to color a face on a preprinted white pumpkin, scan it and watch it appear in AR. 

Here's a look at what Amazon Augmented Reality can do: 

Amazon Augmented Reality is available in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. It's designed to specifically work with Amazon boxes, but you can test the feature (without a box) on Amazon's website. 

The boxes have started shipping in the US and will circulate for a limited time, but customers can keep using them past Halloween, according to the company. 

This isn't the first time Amazon has tried to get creative with its boxes. The tech giant previously released directions to reuse your boxes by building a cat condo, a rocket ship, a robot costume, a car, a fort or a windmill for mini golf. 

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Twitter to join Facebook in banning Holocaust denial content, report says – CNET

coronavirus-twitter-logo-9701
Image by Pixabay; illustration by CNET

Twitter will start removing Holocaust denial content from its social media platform under its hateful conduct policy, a report Wednesday said. It comes two days after Facebook updated its hate speech policy to prohibit "content that denies or distorts the Holocaust."

A spokesperson confirmed to Bloomberg that Twitter will remove content that "attempts to deny or diminish" violent events like the Holocaust.

"We strongly condemn anti-semitism, and hateful conduct has absolutely no place on our service," the Twitter spokesperson told Bloomberg. "We also have a robust 'glorification of violence' policy in place and take action against content that glorifies or praises historical acts of violence and genocide, including the Holocaust."

Twitter didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

As well as removing posts that deny the Holocaust -- the World War II genocide of Europe's Jewish population by Nazi Germany and its collaborators -- Facebook will later this year start directing people who search for Holocaust denial terms to credible sources of information. 

"Our decision is supported by the well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people," Monika Bickert, Facebook vice president of content policy, said in a release Monday. It followed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in 2018 saying Holocaust denial content should not be removed from the social media platform because he didn't think those posting it were "intentionally getting it wrong."

Approximately 6 million Jewish people were murdered between 1941 and 1945 in Europe during the second world war, according to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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