Moore’s Law Turns 50, Creator Says It Won’t Go on Forever

With the 50th anniversary of MooreEUs Law, Intel is sharing its impact and its founder is making predictions about the next 50 years. At an event in San Francisco on Monday to honor the anniversary, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore (pictured) predicted that the law named after him will remain valid for another five to 10 years. He said the fact that it has lasted for 50 years is truly amazing but he acknowledged no exponential can go on forever.

Moore laid down what is known as MooreEUs law in 1965. He discovered that the number of transistors per square inch of integrated circuits had doubled every year since its invention. Moore predicted that transistors would continue to decrease in cost at an exponential rate as their number on each silicon chip doubles each year.

Intel said, "Moore's Law has continued to drive staggeringly fast progress in computing technology to deliver unprecedented economic benefits and societal changes."

According to an IHS research report, the technological innovation enabled directly and indirectly by MooreEUs Law continues to drive gains in productivity. As productivity improves, costs decrease and new opportunities emerge that spur economic growth. The report estimates that the impact of MooreEUs Law could be as high as $11 trillion in incremental GDP over the past 20 years.

EUMooreEUs Law has proven to be the most effective predictive tool of the last half-century of technological innovation, economic advancement, and by association, social and cultural change,EU said Dale Ford, vice president of Semiconductors & Components at IHS.

Delivering Remarkable Innovation

We caught up with Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT, to get his thoughts on the 50th anniversary of MooreEUs Law -- and its future.

King told us after Moore's observation about the time required to double transistor density originally appeared in 1965, it became a sort of...

Comments are closed.

Moore’s Law Turns 50, Creator Says It Won’t Go on Forever

With the 50th anniversary of MooreEUs Law, Intel is sharing its impact and its founder is making predictions about the next 50 years. At an event in San Francisco on Monday to honor the anniversary, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore (pictured) predicted that the law named after him will remain valid for another five to 10 years. He said the fact that it has lasted for 50 years is truly amazing but he acknowledged no exponential can go on forever.

Moore laid down what is known as MooreEUs law in 1965. He discovered that the number of transistors per square inch of integrated circuits had doubled every year since its invention. Moore predicted that transistors would continue to decrease in cost at an exponential rate as their number on each silicon chip doubles each year.

Intel said, "Moore's Law has continued to drive staggeringly fast progress in computing technology to deliver unprecedented economic benefits and societal changes."

According to an IHS research report, the technological innovation enabled directly and indirectly by MooreEUs Law continues to drive gains in productivity. As productivity improves, costs decrease and new opportunities emerge that spur economic growth. The report estimates that the impact of MooreEUs Law could be as high as $11 trillion in incremental GDP over the past 20 years.

EUMooreEUs Law has proven to be the most effective predictive tool of the last half-century of technological innovation, economic advancement, and by association, social and cultural change,EU said Dale Ford, vice president of Semiconductors & Components at IHS.

Delivering Remarkable Innovation

We caught up with Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT, to get his thoughts on the 50th anniversary of MooreEUs Law -- and its future.

King told us after Moore's observation about the time required to double transistor density originally appeared in 1965, it became a sort of...

Comments are closed.