Microsoft Pushes Workaround for IE Emergency

Software giant Microsoft just woke up from a bad dream. Redmond is facing a zero-day vulnerability in all versions of its Internet Explorer browser and has rushed an urgent fix for the bug.

Microsoft is officially investigating public reports of the vulnerability and admits it is aware of targeted attacks that attempt to exploit the zero-day flaw in Internet Explorer 8 and Internet Explorer 9. Redmond was fast on its feet to release a workaround known as the "CVE-2013-3893 MSHTML Shim Workaround," to prevent hackers from exploiting the software.

The company said it is dealing with a remote code execution vulnerability. It seems there's a flaw in the way IE accesses an object in memory that has been deleted or hasn't been properly allocated.

"The vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code in the context of the current user within Internet Explorer," Microsoft said in a security advisory. "An attacker could host a specially crafted Web site that is designed to exploit this vulnerability through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the Web site."

Good News, Bad News

We caught up with Paul Henry, a security and forensic analyst at Lumension, to get his thoughts on the workaround. He told us there's good news and bad news here. The good news is there are many mitigating factors. The bad news is this is a very wide-reaching workaround, affecting all versions of IE across all operating systems, from XP to RT.

"And more bad news: the average user is very susceptible to being hit with this. The average user does not run the restricted sites mode, is not using the Enhanced Security Configuration, and [may be] all too willing to click on phishing emails," Henry said.

"I recommend employing the mitigating factors, as well...

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