Microsoft on Board with SQL Server for Linux

After resisting the idea for years, Microsoft now appears to be on board with open source computing. In a blog post, Redmond announced that companies will soon be able to run portions of its SQL Server database software on Linux.

Microsoft will at least offer SQL Server?EU?s core capabilities, with the later addition of other components depending on customer demand and feedback. About 25 percent of all the servers running in Microsoft?EU?s Azure cloud service are powered by Linux, the open source operating system. Previously, though, users couldn?EU?t run most Microsoft software on their Linux servers. This week?EU?s announcement should change that.

New Philosophy

Not many Microsoft applications have been able to run on Linux to this point, and most of the ones that could were acquired from other companies such as Skype. But increasingly, the company has toyed with the idea of supporting software on other platforms. Microsoft recently said it was buying Xamarin, a company that develops a cross-platform version of Microsoft?EU?s .NET programming framework, which helps developers use Microsoft?EU?s C# programming language to build applications that run on Linux and Apple as well as Windows.

Matt Aslett, research director, data platforms and analytics, at 451 Research, told us that Microsoft?EU?s announcement was notable because it indicates ongoing changes in Microsoft's overall strategy. He said that it illustrates the impact that cloud has had on the relative importance of the operating system, and it spices up Microsoft's ongoing competition with its database rivals Oracle, IBM and SAP.

"The launch of SQL Server on Linux is a symbol of the fact that this is no longer the same Microsoft that was previously run by Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer, who famously once described Linux as a 'cancer,'" said Aslett.

Turf Battle

In October, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said that Microsoft loved Linux, perhaps signaling...

Comments are closed.

Microsoft on Board with SQL Server for Linux

After resisting the idea for years, Microsoft now appears to be on board with open source computing. In a blog post, Redmond announced that companies will soon be able to run portions of its SQL Server database software on Linux.

Microsoft will at least offer SQL Server?EU?s core capabilities, with the later addition of other components depending on customer demand and feedback. About 25 percent of all the servers running in Microsoft?EU?s Azure cloud service are powered by Linux, the open source operating system. Previously, though, users couldn?EU?t run most Microsoft software on their Linux servers. This week?EU?s announcement should change that.

New Philosophy

Not many Microsoft applications have been able to run on Linux to this point, and most of the ones that could were acquired from other companies such as Skype. But increasingly, the company has toyed with the idea of supporting software on other platforms. Microsoft recently said it was buying Xamarin, a company that develops a cross-platform version of Microsoft?EU?s .NET programming framework, which helps developers use Microsoft?EU?s C# programming language to build applications that run on Linux and Apple as well as Windows.

Matt Aslett, research director, data platforms and analytics, at 451 Research, told us that Microsoft?EU?s announcement was notable because it indicates ongoing changes in Microsoft's overall strategy. He said that it illustrates the impact that cloud has had on the relative importance of the operating system, and it spices up Microsoft's ongoing competition with its database rivals Oracle, IBM and SAP.

"The launch of SQL Server on Linux is a symbol of the fact that this is no longer the same Microsoft that was previously run by Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer, who famously once described Linux as a 'cancer,'" said Aslett.

Turf Battle

In October, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said that Microsoft loved Linux, perhaps signaling...

Comments are closed.