Lawsuit Says Magic Leap Is Hostile Workplace for Women

In April 2015, Tannen Campbell says she was brought on at Magic Leap, Broward County's much-hyped, super-secretive virtual-reality startup by CEO Rony Abovitz. The boss hoped she might be able to address what the billion-dollar company internally called its "pink-blue problem": it was a boys club with no concept of how to attract female employees or customers beyond creating pink versions of its products.

But a year and-a-half after starting as head of strategic marketing and brand identity, Campbell couldn't get Abovitz to sit for the presentation she'd prepared. Despite trying again and again to schedule a meeting on the topic, she claims, she was told by Abovitz's secretary that the issue was not among his priorities.

Instead, Campbell alleges in a gender discrimination suit filed Monday, she showed up day after day to a workplace where female employees were routinely condescended by male counterparts who made comments about their "pretty little faces" and "trouble with computers;" seen as incapable of serving in engineering roles and relegated to softer sciences; ridiculed for their ideas; and told not to speak at company meetings.

As a result, the company has missed key internal deadlines - including launch, which Campbell says was pushed back at least four times during her time at the company, which ended when she was fired in December. She claims her termination was a result of challenging Abovitz to address the misogyny ingrained in Magic Leap's culture.

"Due in large part to its gender imbalance and the misogynistic attitudes and behavior of its male employees, including executive management," the suit says, "Magic Leap's corporate culture is one of macho bullying, where women's work and ideas, including those of Campbell, are ridiculed openly and their opinions are ignored in favor of those of those of their male counterparts."

A spokesperson for Magic Leap did not...

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Lawsuit Says Magic Leap Is Hostile Workplace for Women

In April 2015, Tannen Campbell says she was brought on at Magic Leap, Broward County's much-hyped, super-secretive virtual-reality startup by CEO Rony Abovitz. The boss hoped she might be able to address what the billion-dollar company internally called its "pink-blue problem": it was a boys club with no concept of how to attract female employees or customers beyond creating pink versions of its products.

But a year and-a-half after starting as head of strategic marketing and brand identity, Campbell couldn't get Abovitz to sit for the presentation she'd prepared. Despite trying again and again to schedule a meeting on the topic, she claims, she was told by Abovitz's secretary that the issue was not among his priorities.

Instead, Campbell alleges in a gender discrimination suit filed Monday, she showed up day after day to a workplace where female employees were routinely condescended by male counterparts who made comments about their "pretty little faces" and "trouble with computers;" seen as incapable of serving in engineering roles and relegated to softer sciences; ridiculed for their ideas; and told not to speak at company meetings.

As a result, the company has missed key internal deadlines - including launch, which Campbell says was pushed back at least four times during her time at the company, which ended when she was fired in December. She claims her termination was a result of challenging Abovitz to address the misogyny ingrained in Magic Leap's culture.

"Due in large part to its gender imbalance and the misogynistic attitudes and behavior of its male employees, including executive management," the suit says, "Magic Leap's corporate culture is one of macho bullying, where women's work and ideas, including those of Campbell, are ridiculed openly and their opinions are ignored in favor of those of those of their male counterparts."

A spokesperson for Magic Leap did not...

Comments are closed.