Google’s Space Race: Shooting for the Moon

ThereEUs a team from Spain, and another from Italy. The Japanese team calls itself Hakuta, and there are numerous teams from the U.S. TheyEUre working hard with a serious sense of competition. But theyEUre not getting ready for the winter Olympics in Sochi.

ItEUs T-minus 23 months for the international assortment of scientists and their sponsors who are literally shooting for the moon in GoogleEUs Lunar XPrize Challenge. The goal is to successfully launch an unmanned spacecraft, land it on the lunar surface and send back high-definition images, in exchange for a $30 million prize from the technology giant and its cosponsors, which include aerodynamic firm Northrup Grumman, phone giant Nokia, and chipmaker Qualcomm. The mission must be accomplished by the end of 2015 to win the grand prize.

Not About The Money

Many, if not all the groups will spend more than the $30 million to get off the ground, but itEUs not about the money. For some, itEUs a matter of national pride: only the three major superpowers, the U.S., Russia and China have so far reached the moon.

Others are hoping to develop new technology and ignite new enthusiasm about space exploration, just as the U.S. Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s did. The last U.S. lunar landing was Apollo 17 in 1972, and the Russians landed an unmanned craft the following year.

China is currently most active, with a six-wheeled robotic moon rover named Jade Rabbit roaming the lunar landscape. The Yutu rover began its mission in December, marking the first moon landing by a space probe in 37 years.

Inspiring Radical Breakthroughs

The XPrize FoundationEUs goal, according to its Web site is to promote EUradical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity, thereby inspiring the formation of new industries and the revitalization of markets that are currently stuck due to existing...

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