Google Nexus 5: Solid Phone, Superb Value

There are solid reasons to be drawn to the Nexus 5, Google's winner of a new handset. The "pure Android" smartphone from South Korea's LG is thin, screaming fast and, despite weighing just under 4.6 ounces, comfortable to hold.

It has a terrific nearly 5-inch full HD high-resolution display. And a phone that's infused with Google-ness promises to deliver Android updates ahead of rival devices.

The 8-megapixel rear camera is improved compared with prior Nexus handsets. There's now optical image stabilization for video, and an HDR + feature that combines a rapid burst of shots into one best photo. The pictures I shot were generally decent, but the camera is not on par with some of the finest smartphone shooters out there, a list that includes the iPhone 5s, the Nokia Lumia 1020, HTC One, Samsung Galaxy S4 or LG's G2.

The best thing about the Nexus 5 is all the sweetness you get in totality at an extremely attractive price. It costs just $349 for an "unlocked" phone with 16 gigabytes of storage, or $399 for 32GB. You'd be hard-pressed to find a better value among such premium-class devices.

The Nexus 5 is the first phone to showcase Android 4.4 or "KitKat," the candy-bar named fresh version of the mobile operating system that is still weeks away on other devices.

On the Nexus 5, I love that you can just bark out "OK Google" from any home screen to initiate a voice command (for making calls, playing music, directions, etc.) without pressing buttons first.

The feature generally worked well in my tests, though the Nexus 5 doesn't take it quite as far as the Google-owned Motorola Moto X does with a similar stunt.

The KitKat phone dialer gives priority to the contacts you talk to most. When you search your contacts, Google also searches for nearby...

Comments are closed.

Google Nexus 5: Solid Phone, Superb Value

There are solid reasons to be drawn to the Nexus 5, Google's winner of a new handset. The "pure Android" smartphone from South Korea's LG is thin, screaming fast and, despite weighing just under 4.6 ounces, comfortable to hold.

It has a terrific nearly 5-inch full HD high-resolution display. And a phone that's infused with Google-ness promises to deliver Android updates ahead of rival devices.

The 8-megapixel rear camera is improved compared with prior Nexus handsets. There's now optical image stabilization for video, and an HDR + feature that combines a rapid burst of shots into one best photo. The pictures I shot were generally decent, but the camera is not on par with some of the finest smartphone shooters out there, a list that includes the iPhone 5s, the Nokia Lumia 1020, HTC One, Samsung Galaxy S4 or LG's G2.

The best thing about the Nexus 5 is all the sweetness you get in totality at an extremely attractive price. It costs just $349 for an "unlocked" phone with 16 gigabytes of storage, or $399 for 32GB. You'd be hard-pressed to find a better value among such premium-class devices.

The Nexus 5 is the first phone to showcase Android 4.4 or "KitKat," the candy-bar named fresh version of the mobile operating system that is still weeks away on other devices.

On the Nexus 5, I love that you can just bark out "OK Google" from any home screen to initiate a voice command (for making calls, playing music, directions, etc.) without pressing buttons first.

The feature generally worked well in my tests, though the Nexus 5 doesn't take it quite as far as the Google-owned Motorola Moto X does with a similar stunt.

The KitKat phone dialer gives priority to the contacts you talk to most. When you search your contacts, Google also searches for nearby...

Comments are closed.