Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice

Google Glass may find its first markets in verticals where hands-free access to information is a boon. Medicine is among the most prominent of those areas, as evidenced by the number of Glass-wearing experiments in medical practice and education that are under way.

At Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, for instance, doctors are testing the feasibility of using Google Glass in the emergency room. According to Brown University's newspaper, the Brown Daily Herald, one use case involves Glass-recording patients with dermatological issues such as burns, and then transmitting the video with audio to an on-call dermatologist.

Such a use is two-way telemedicine, but much more mobile than earlier attempts. The hospital reported that patient responses have been positive, and that it is "like the dermatologist is in the room."

Everyday ER Gear

The Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University has used Glass in operating rooms to help teach orthopedic surgery to medical students, from a first-person point-of-view. But doctors say that the headset could be more useful if it could track where the wearer is looking, and record accordingly.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston is another testing site for Glass's many medical possibilities. In one real-life case, Dr. Steven Horng was questioning a patient with bleeding in the brain who was allergic to some kinds of blood pressure drugs, but couldn't remember their names.

Instead of having to waste valuable time by finding the data through a computer screen, he simply called up the files on the eyepiece as he was treating the patient. At Beth Israel, patient records can be called up by glancing through the Glass lens at QR codes, which are posted on the doorways of patient rooms.

Because of such success stories, the hospital is expanding this week its Glass experiment to its entire emergency department for everyday...

Comments are closed.