Google Gets Heat for ‘Forgetting’ BBC Article

After opposing the "right to be forgotten" law in Europe, Google is now getting criticism for how it is implementing the new regulation. A spokesperson for the European Commission (EC) has said that the company's decision to remove a BBC story from search results was "not a good judgment."

The 2007 blog post by Robert Peston about financial wrong-doing at financial firm Merrill Lynch was taken down as part of the company's massive fulfillment of the "right to be forgotten" ruling. Nevertheless, EC spokesman Ryan Heath said that the court decision should not allow users to "Photoshop their lives." Heath represents Neelie Kroes, the vice president of the EC and a leader of the new European privacy legislation.

"Google clearly has a strong interest in making sure that they're able to work with whatever the legal requirements are, so they position themselves in a particular way over that," he told the BBC.

'New and Evolving'

For its part, Google has said it has looked at and decided on each request individually. However, some observers are suggesting the company is finding it easier to simply comply with every request. "This is a new and evolving process for us," the tech giant said in a statement.

Reportedly, Google is looking at over 250,000 search results that users have said they wanted removed, following more than 70,000 requests by users at the end of May and throughout June. France is the highest-requesting nation, with more than 14,000 requests made during that period, while second-place Germany has over 12,600. The U.K. clocks in at about 8,500.

A reader making a comment under the story, apparently asked Google to remove the link to the Peston post. Now, when someone searches the name of that unnamed commenter, that link will no longer appear. In Europe, that is. Outside of Europe, the...

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