Facebook Clarifies What’s OK, What’s Not

You might not think that nudity and hate speech go together, but in the case of trying to describe what's OK and what's not in Facebook postings, those two topics got most of the attention over the weekend.

The social media giant on Sunday released a clarification of its "Community Standards" governing user behavior and the content of posts. In a post to the Facebook news blog, Monika Bickert, head of Global Policy Management, and Chris Sonderby, deputy general counsel, laid out the objectives of the new language.

"Today we are providing more detail and clarity on what is and is not allowed," the pair wrote. "For example, what exactly do we mean by nudity, or what do we mean by hate speech? While our policies and standards themselves are not changing, we have heard from people that it would be helpful to provide more clarity and examples, so we are doing so with today's update."

Facebook, which has more than 1.3 billion users spread over virtually the entire planet, has been forced to grapple with competing social values and standards of decency, problems that nearly every global business will have to confront at some point. As more and more businesses focus their efforts on the Internet, these types of debates will only grow more common.

Multi-Cultural Challenges

Much of the update focused on those two controversial aspects of speech: nudity and hate speech. Facebook has received considerable criticism recently for removing photos of mothers breastfeeding their babies, or cancer survivors posting photos of their mastectomies. The new language of the policy makes it clear that such photos may remain on the site.

"We also restrict some images of female breasts if they include the nipple," as the "Encouraging Respectful Behavior section puts it, "but we always allow photos of women actively engaged in breastfeeding or...

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Facebook Clarifies What’s OK, What’s Not

You might not think that nudity and hate speech go together, but in the case of trying to describe what's OK and what's not in Facebook postings, those two topics got most of the attention over the weekend.

The social media giant on Sunday released a clarification of its "Community Standards" governing user behavior and the content of posts. In a post to the Facebook news blog, Monika Bickert, head of Global Policy Management, and Chris Sonderby, deputy general counsel, laid out the objectives of the new language.

"Today we are providing more detail and clarity on what is and is not allowed," the pair wrote. "For example, what exactly do we mean by nudity, or what do we mean by hate speech? While our policies and standards themselves are not changing, we have heard from people that it would be helpful to provide more clarity and examples, so we are doing so with today's update."

Facebook, which has more than 1.3 billion users spread over virtually the entire planet, has been forced to grapple with competing social values and standards of decency, problems that nearly every global business will have to confront at some point. As more and more businesses focus their efforts on the Internet, these types of debates will only grow more common.

Multi-Cultural Challenges

Much of the update focused on those two controversial aspects of speech: nudity and hate speech. Facebook has received considerable criticism recently for removing photos of mothers breastfeeding their babies, or cancer survivors posting photos of their mastectomies. The new language of the policy makes it clear that such photos may remain on the site.

"We also restrict some images of female breasts if they include the nipple," as the "Encouraging Respectful Behavior section puts it, "but we always allow photos of women actively engaged in breastfeeding or...

Comments are closed.