Edward Snowden Cheers Victory in Op-Ed on Surveillance

Former U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden said he has seen a "profound" difference in public opinion regarding widespread government surveillance of phone, e-mail and Internet communications.

In 2013, Snowden shared thousands of classified documents with journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, who wrote numerous articles revealing the extent to which the U.S. and other countries spy on the communications of ordinary citizens around the world.

Snowden has been living in Russia, which provided him asylum, since shortly after revealing the secret documents. He faces federal espionage charges in the U.S. that could land him in prison for at least 30 years.

The information contained in the NSA documents leaked by Snowden has led to a public conversation about how to balance security and privacy concerns in the online and offline worlds. It has also led to greater public support by many technology companies for strong encryption to protect their customers' private communications.

'Grateful To Have Been So Wrong'

In a commentary in the New York Times on Thursday, published on the two-year anniversary of his first meeting with Greenwald and Poitras in a hotel room in Hong Kong, Snowden recalled being worried that "we might have put our privileged lives at risk for nothing -- that the public would react with indifference, or practiced cynicism, to the revelations. Never have I been so grateful to have been so wrong."

Snowden pointed to the recent court decision that found the NSA's call-tracking program was illegal. He also noted that even President Barack Obama has reversed his one-time support for the program. The mass surveillance of phone calls was ended as part of Congress' June 2 vote to renew parts of the U.S. Patriot Act.

"This is the power of an informed public," Snowden said. "The balance of power is...

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Edward Snowden Cheers Victory in Op-Ed on Surveillance

Former U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden said he has seen a "profound" difference in public opinion regarding widespread government surveillance of phone, e-mail and Internet communications.

In 2013, Snowden shared thousands of classified documents with journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, who wrote numerous articles revealing the extent to which the U.S. and other countries spy on the communications of ordinary citizens around the world.

Snowden has been living in Russia, which provided him asylum, since shortly after revealing the secret documents. He faces federal espionage charges in the U.S. that could land him in prison for at least 30 years.

The information contained in the NSA documents leaked by Snowden has led to a public conversation about how to balance security and privacy concerns in the online and offline worlds. It has also led to greater public support by many technology companies for strong encryption to protect their customers' private communications.

'Grateful To Have Been So Wrong'

In a commentary in the New York Times on Thursday, published on the two-year anniversary of his first meeting with Greenwald and Poitras in a hotel room in Hong Kong, Snowden recalled being worried that "we might have put our privileged lives at risk for nothing -- that the public would react with indifference, or practiced cynicism, to the revelations. Never have I been so grateful to have been so wrong."

Snowden pointed to the recent court decision that found the NSA's call-tracking program was illegal. He also noted that even President Barack Obama has reversed his one-time support for the program. The mass surveillance of phone calls was ended as part of Congress' June 2 vote to renew parts of the U.S. Patriot Act.

"This is the power of an informed public," Snowden said. "The balance of power is...

Comments are closed.