Did We Spy on the Pope? US Feels the Heat on NSA

Things continue to get worse for the U.S. as new National Security Agency documents and policies come to light as a result of Edward Snowden's decision to go against the U.S. and release classified information he had access to while working for the NSA as a contract employee.

In the past week, the U.S. has had to deny claims that the NSA spied on the Vatican and also had to find ways to minimize its spying on more than 30 countries and their leaders. Officials in Germany, Italy, France, Brazil and others have all registered protests in response to the revelations that the NSA was spying on them.

Spying on the Pope?

Although spying between countries is no surprise, it is not normally talked about, which is why the NSA's spying activities becoming a topic of conversation is such a big issue for the U.S. While countries frequently spy on each other, new reports suggesting that the NSA spied on the Vatican are quite unusual and the agency is denying them.

Calls to and from the Vatican were allegedly tapped between Dec. 10, 2012, and Jan. 8, 2013. These calls were divided into four groups, leadership intentions, threats to the financial system, foreign policy objectives and human rights.

It is assumed that the information came from Snowden but the magazine that first published the accusation did not cite sources.

While a cardinal from Argentina voiced his concerns regarding the report and feared that the NSA may have tapped the phone lines until Pope Francis' election, Vatican officials have been quiet.

"The National Security Agency does not target the Vatican," said an NSA spokesperson. "Assertions that NSA has targeted the Vatican, published in Italy's Panorama magazine, are not true."

Social Networks and Search Engines

Snowden released new documents this week detailing how the NSA and its British counterpart...

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Did We Spy on the Pope? US Feels the Heat on NSA

Things continue to get worse for the U.S. as new National Security Agency documents and policies come to light as a result of Edward Snowden's decision to go against the U.S. and release classified information he had access to while working for the NSA as a contract employee.

In the past week, the U.S. has had to deny claims that the NSA spied on the Vatican and also had to find ways to minimize its spying on more than 30 countries and their leaders. Officials in Germany, Italy, France, Brazil and others have all registered protests in response to the revelations that the NSA was spying on them.

Spying on the Pope?

Although spying between countries is no surprise, it is not normally talked about, which is why the NSA's spying activities becoming a topic of conversation is such a big issue for the U.S. While countries frequently spy on each other, new reports suggesting that the NSA spied on the Vatican are quite unusual and the agency is denying them.

Calls to and from the Vatican were allegedly tapped between Dec. 10, 2012, and Jan. 8, 2013. These calls were divided into four groups, leadership intentions, threats to the financial system, foreign policy objectives and human rights.

It is assumed that the information came from Snowden but the magazine that first published the accusation did not cite sources.

While a cardinal from Argentina voiced his concerns regarding the report and feared that the NSA may have tapped the phone lines until Pope Francis' election, Vatican officials have been quiet.

"The National Security Agency does not target the Vatican," said an NSA spokesperson. "Assertions that NSA has targeted the Vatican, published in Italy's Panorama magazine, are not true."

Social Networks and Search Engines

Snowden released new documents this week detailing how the NSA and its British counterpart...

Comments are closed.