Chinese Hacker Indictments a Wakeup Call for Enterprises

The cyber wars made major headlines on Monday when the U.S. Department of Justice indicted five Chinese military officers on charges of computer hacking and economic espionage, among other crimes. The hackers were allegedly targeting six entities in the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries.

For all the celebrating in security industry circles over the U.S. government's willingness to take this bold step, FBI Director James B. Comey signaled that the battle isn't over.

"For too long, the Chinese government has blatantly sought to use cyber espionage to obtain economic advantage for its state-owned industries," Comey said. "The indictment announced today is an important step. But there are many more victims, and there is much more to be done. With our unique criminal and national security authorities, we will continue to use all legal tools at our disposal to counter cyber espionage from all sources."

So what does this mean for enterprises? We asked two security industry experts for their reactions and views on where enterprise IT admins go from here.

One Kind of Warfare

We caught up with Ken Silva, president of ManTech Cyber Solutions International, a cyber security firm, to get his thoughts on the indictment. He told us these recent developments further legitimize what security experts have known for years: U.S. corporations are under constant attack from nation-state hackers.

"The Chinese have been hacking into both corporations and government agencies for years," Silva said. "If there is a hope that these indictments will lead to the Chinese government's help, it is asking for something that just isn't realistic at this point."

Silva noted that the DOJ clearly has forensic evidence and many additional details on these hackers -- and what was stolen or attempted to be stolen -- that it has not disclosed.

"Today, this is one kind of warfare...

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Chinese Hacker Indictments a Wakeup Call for Enterprises

The cyber wars made major headlines on Monday when the U.S. Department of Justice indicted five Chinese military officers on charges of computer hacking and economic espionage, among other crimes. The hackers were allegedly targeting six entities in the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries.

For all the celebrating in security industry circles over the U.S. government's willingness to take this bold step, FBI Director James B. Comey signaled that the battle isn't over.

"For too long, the Chinese government has blatantly sought to use cyber espionage to obtain economic advantage for its state-owned industries," Comey said. "The indictment announced today is an important step. But there are many more victims, and there is much more to be done. With our unique criminal and national security authorities, we will continue to use all legal tools at our disposal to counter cyber espionage from all sources."

So what does this mean for enterprises? We asked two security industry experts for their reactions and views on where enterprise IT admins go from here.

One Kind of Warfare

We caught up with Ken Silva, president of ManTech Cyber Solutions International, a cyber security firm, to get his thoughts on the indictment. He told us these recent developments further legitimize what security experts have known for years: U.S. corporations are under constant attack from nation-state hackers.

"The Chinese have been hacking into both corporations and government agencies for years," Silva said. "If there is a hope that these indictments will lead to the Chinese government's help, it is asking for something that just isn't realistic at this point."

Silva noted that the DOJ clearly has forensic evidence and many additional details on these hackers -- and what was stolen or attempted to be stolen -- that it has not disclosed.

"Today, this is one kind of warfare...

Comments are closed.