California DMV Investigates Possible Security Breach

The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) in California may have suffered a widespread security breach, leaving millions of online customers open to credit card fraud. Despite a lack of evidence, police and the DMV have warned that a breach may have occurred and EUout of an abundance of caution," the DMV has opened an investigation.

Security blogger Brian Krebs first reported on the issue and provided evidence from multiple banks that had received alerts from MasterCard. Even though the alert did not state where the breach occurred, subsequent information from the DMV has revealed what may have happened. While not providing extensive details about the breach, the agency said it had not yet found evidence to suggest that its computer system had been hacked.

As of March 21, the DMV still did not know if the breach affected its payment processor or the actual credit card companies. Both of those scenarios take the blame away from the DMV, even though there is still no public evidence to suggest that its system was not compromised. EUIn its investigation, the department is performing a forensic review of its systems and seeking information regarding any potential breach from both the external vendor that processes the DMVEUs credit card transactions and the credit card companies themselves,EU the California DMV said in a statement.

Massive Scale

Conservative estimates that are based on public DMV data suggest that if the breach did occur, there are millions of potential victims. Recent attacks, like the one against Target at the end of last year that compromised the credit and debit card data of some 70 million customers are much larger than the possible DMV breach. However, the DMVEUs own statistics reveal that many of its payments come from online transactions, which are at the center of the investigation.

In 2012, there were...

Comments are closed.