BlackBerry, NantHealth Debut Cancer Genone Browser

Working in collaboration with the cloud-based health technology company NantHealth, BlackBerry plans to launch a clinical browser on its Passport smartphone that will give doctors "unprecedented" access to cancer patients' genetic data. The NantOmics Cancer Genome Browser will be preloaded on some Passport devices and become available to physicians in early 2015.

Based in Waterloo, Ontario, NantHealth is part of NantWorks, a group of cloud-based healthcare companies that uses real-time machine learning to provide big-data-enabled medical information whenever its needed at the point of care. The organization was founded by Patrick Soon-Shiong, a physician who is also executive director of the UCLA Wireless Health Institute and Global Director for Cancer Services and Bioinformatics at Providence Health and Services.

Genetic Mapping for Cancer Treatment

According to BlackBerry, its Passport device provides an ideal delivery system for the NantOmics browser because it supports the full encryption needed to comply with HIPAA healthcare security requirements. Its large, high-resolution screen also provides a detailed view of genetic information for physicians treating cancer patients, the company said.

Profiled in a 60 Minutes segment this past weekend, Soon-Shiong has made headlines for his "unconventional" approaches toward treating cancer. As CBS noted, he is also "the richest man in Los Angeles, a doctor and entrepreneur who is worth an estimated $11 billion."

Soon-Shiong's unique cancer-fighting strategy involved classifying cancer by the characteristics of its genetic mutation, rather than by its physical location in the patient's body. As he said in the 60 Minutes segment, that might mean treating a breast cancer with a drug developed for a lung cancer if both exhibit the same genetic mutation.

Set to Debut at CES

"The proprietary NantOmics Cancer Genome Browser enables clinicians for the first time to investigate a tumor genome from the full three billion bases down to the single-base level in...

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BlackBerry, NantHealth Debut Cancer Genone Browser

Working in collaboration with the cloud-based health technology company NantHealth, BlackBerry plans to launch a clinical browser on its Passport smartphone that will give doctors "unprecedented" access to cancer patients' genetic data. The NantOmics Cancer Genome Browser will be preloaded on some Passport devices and become available to physicians in early 2015.

Based in Waterloo, Ontario, NantHealth is part of NantWorks, a group of cloud-based healthcare companies that uses real-time machine learning to provide big-data-enabled medical information whenever its needed at the point of care. The organization was founded by Patrick Soon-Shiong, a physician who is also executive director of the UCLA Wireless Health Institute and Global Director for Cancer Services and Bioinformatics at Providence Health and Services.

Genetic Mapping for Cancer Treatment

According to BlackBerry, its Passport device provides an ideal delivery system for the NantOmics browser because it supports the full encryption needed to comply with HIPAA healthcare security requirements. Its large, high-resolution screen also provides a detailed view of genetic information for physicians treating cancer patients, the company said.

Profiled in a 60 Minutes segment this past weekend, Soon-Shiong has made headlines for his "unconventional" approaches toward treating cancer. As CBS noted, he is also "the richest man in Los Angeles, a doctor and entrepreneur who is worth an estimated $11 billion."

Soon-Shiong's unique cancer-fighting strategy involved classifying cancer by the characteristics of its genetic mutation, rather than by its physical location in the patient's body. As he said in the 60 Minutes segment, that might mean treating a breast cancer with a drug developed for a lung cancer if both exhibit the same genetic mutation.

Set to Debut at CES

"The proprietary NantOmics Cancer Genome Browser enables clinicians for the first time to investigate a tumor genome from the full three billion bases down to the single-base level in...

Comments are closed.