Karma Automotive teases new all-electric GSe6 with pricing and preorders – Roadshow

gse-platform1

The GSe6's body will be mostly Revero, Karma says, but here are its electric guts.

Karma

More and more vehicle manufacturers, especially smaller ones, are focusing on offering their vehicles via preorders. This is a risky proposition for the customer because, as we saw with Tesla's Model 3 reservations, you can be stuck waiting a long time for a car that you ultimately know very little about.

The latest carmaker to give preorders a whirl is Karma Automotive, makers of the Revero, which used to be the Fisker Karma (but now Fisker is its own company again, and it's all very confusing). Here's the thing, though: Karma is going a step further and offering preorders on an $80,000 car that it isn't even showing whole pictures of. That takes chutzpah, friends.

The Karma GSe6 is being marketed as the brand's first fully battery-electric vehicle. Details are suspiciously thin on the ground here, beyond the fact that it will have an aluminum body based mainly on the Revero GT, be capable of one-pedal driving, have adaptive headlights, feature a steering wheel with haptic feedback, offer Level 2 autonomy (nothing to brag about in 2020, btw) and be assembled in California.

karma-gse-6-011

Karma wants to drive preorders for the GSe6 with this as basically the only available photo.

Karma

We know nothing about the GSe6's powertrain, and that's worrying when it's coming from a company best known for making a car for years with minimal changes that they bought off another failing company with someone else's engine in it. Add in that the company hasn't always been in the best financial shape, and it's all kind of worrying.

Now, way back in April, Karma talked about bringing an electric version of the Revero called the GTE to production, but even then, the potential specs being bandied about were a little dubious -- namely, the 400-mile range number.

Karma representatives confirmed that the GSe6 is basically the evolved and iterated-upon current version of what was the GTE. It also confirmed that the reason there aren't any specs is that the charging speeds, range, battery management system and capacities, as well as the inverters and minor design elements, aren't "100% baked."

With its $79,900 asking price, Karma seems to be targeting both the Tesla Model S and the Lucid Air, though it manages to come in slightly above both of those vehicles' current price points, and even then, a prospective buyer would likely have to be pretty bored with current offerings to make that leap.

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Even car thieves are over sedans and coupes, now targeting full-size trucks – Roadshow

97accord-v6-lxsedan-source

The fifth-generation Honda Accord my be the oldest car on the list, and likely the model on the list for the longest, but its place is slipping.

Honda

It's probably fair to assume that when you -- or most people, really -- think about the most stolen cars in America, you probably picture clapped-out 1990s Hondas and Toyotas. While that certainly was the case for a long time -- partly due to the cars' popularity and partly because, let's face it, they were easy to steal -- that isn't the case anymore.

Want proof? Well, the National Insurance Crime Bureau has just published its annual Hot Wheels report on Tuesday that details not only the make and model of the most stolen cars overall but also the year and which cars are the most stolen in a particular state. So, what makes the top of the list for 2019?

In a move that surprised the hell out of us, the most stolen vehicle in America is now the 2006 Ford full-size pickup (think your F-150 and Super-Duty models). This makes a lot of sense on a few levels. First, the F-150 is the best-selling vehicle in the country by a large margin, so like those '90s Hondas, there are plenty of victims to choose from. Next, trucks' and SUVs' popularity has likely trickled down to the illicit used parts business, making coupes and sedans less popular targets.

ford-f-150-fx4-09-07-2009

It's now open season on the mid-aughts version of the Ford F-series pickups, so don't get too attached to yours, friend.

IFCAR via Wikipedia

OK, but what other vehicles are on the list? Well, somewhat unsurprisingly, the 1997 Honda Accord is still on there, which represents both impressive staying power and a shocking lack of resistance to automotive malfeasance. It's way down at no. 4, though. No. 2 on the list is also a Honda -- the 2000 Honda Civic. No. 3 is the 2004 Chevrolet full-size pickups. Rounding out the top five is the 2007 Toyota Camry.

Now, as we get a little deeper into the top 10, things get more interesting. Specifically with the vehicles in seventh and ninth place -- the 2018 Toyota Corolla and the 2018 GMC full-size truck, respectively. One would think that over the past few decades, cars have gotten much harder to steal, but that may not be as much the case as we'd previously imagined.

So what can you do as an owner of one of these models? Well, beyond not getting overly emotionally attached, you can make sure you park in well-lit and highly trafficked areas or inside in a secure garage. It's all about making the theft as inconvenient as possible for your would-be car thief.

If you're interested in checking out the top models stolen in your particular state, NICB has you covered, too (PDF). It's published the results of its 2019 model year study on its website.

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Even car thieves are over sedans and coupes, now targeting full-size trucks – Roadshow

97accord-v6-lxsedan-source

The fifth-generation Honda Accord my be the oldest car on the list, and likely the model on the list for the longest, but its place is slipping.

Honda

It's probably fair to assume that when you -- or most people, really -- think about the most stolen cars in America, you probably picture clapped-out 1990s Hondas and Toyotas. While that certainly was the case for a long time -- partly due to the cars' popularity and partly because, let's face it, they were easy to steal -- that isn't the case anymore.

Want proof? Well, the National Insurance Crime Bureau has just published its annual Hot Wheels report on Tuesday that details not only the make and model of the most stolen cars overall but also the year and which cars are the most stolen in a particular state. So, what makes the top of the list for 2019?

In a move that surprised the hell out of us, the most stolen vehicle in America is now the 2006 Ford full-size pickup (think your F-150 and Super-Duty models). This makes a lot of sense on a few levels. First, the F-150 is the best-selling vehicle in the country by a large margin, so like those '90s Hondas, there are plenty of victims to choose from. Next, trucks' and SUVs' popularity has likely trickled down to the illicit used parts business, making coupes and sedans less popular targets.

ford-f-150-fx4-09-07-2009

It's now open season on the mid-aughts version of the Ford F-series pickups, so don't get too attached to yours, friend.

IFCAR via Wikipedia

OK, but what other vehicles are on the list? Well, somewhat unsurprisingly, the 1997 Honda Accord is still on there, which represents both impressive staying power and a shocking lack of resistance to automotive malfeasance. It's way down at no. 4, though. No. 2 on the list is also a Honda -- the 2000 Honda Civic. No. 3 is the 2004 Chevrolet full-size pickups. Rounding out the top five is the 2007 Toyota Camry.

Now, as we get a little deeper into the top 10, things get more interesting. Specifically with the vehicles in seventh and ninth place -- the 2018 Toyota Corolla and the 2018 GMC full-size truck, respectively. One would think that over the past few decades, cars have gotten much harder to steal, but that may not be as much the case as we'd previously imagined.

So what can you do as an owner of one of these models? Well, beyond not getting overly emotionally attached, you can make sure you park in well-lit and highly trafficked areas or inside in a secure garage. It's all about making the theft as inconvenient as possible for your would-be car thief.

If you're interested in checking out the top models stolen in your particular state, NICB has you covered, too (PDF). It's published the results of its 2019 model year study on its website.

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Einride is taking its driverless, electric trucks global – Roadshow

einride-self-driving-truck-prototype-1

The T-Pod was just the start for Swedish trucking startup Einride.

Einride

We've covered Swedish company Einride and its electric, driverless T-Pod and T-Log vehicles, but now, according to an announcement made on Thursday, the company is taking its tech global.

Specifically, it's going to offer the next generation of its short-to-medium-distance electric and Level 4 autonomous trucks to customers around the world with the focus being on use in closed fenced facilities, ports and harbors along with some public roads. This drayage work is similar to what Einride has been working on with its first-generation vehicles.

Beyond that, it plans to have vehicles capable of long-distance highway driving by 2023. This is a fairly ambitious goal, considering how many truck companies have nailed this feat already (Read: none).

The new pods will be known as Autonomous Electric Transports (AETs) and will go by the model designation AET-1, -2, -3 and 4. As you might expect, AET-1 and AET-2 will be the first to launch. Both these first two models will have a gross vehicle weight of 26 tons and a capacity of up to 15 pallets of cargo.

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Einride is taking its driverless, electric trucks global – Roadshow

einride-self-driving-truck-prototype-1

The T-Pod was just the start for Swedish trucking startup Einride.

Einride

We've covered Swedish company Einride and its electric, driverless T-Pod and T-Log vehicles, but now, according to an announcement made on Thursday, the company is taking its tech global.

Specifically, it's going to offer the next generation of its short-to-medium-distance electric and Level 4 autonomous trucks to customers around the world with the focus being on use in closed fenced facilities, ports and harbors along with some public roads. This drayage work is similar to what Einride has been working on with its first-generation vehicles.

Beyond that, it plans to have vehicles capable of long-distance highway driving by 2023. This is a fairly ambitious goal, considering how many truck companies have nailed this feat already (Read: none).

The new pods will be known as Autonomous Electric Transports (AETs) and will go by the model designation AET-1, -2, -3 and 4. As you might expect, AET-1 and AET-2 will be the first to launch. Both these first two models will have a gross vehicle weight of 26 tons and a capacity of up to 15 pallets of cargo.

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2021 Chevy Silverado HD will tow 36,000 pounds, is still king of the uggos – Roadshow

2021-chevrolet-silverado-3500hd-029

Sure, it'll tow the moon out of orbit, but that face hasn't gotten any better with time.

Even as the world around us gets crazier, the truck wars show no sign of stopping -- or even slowing down. Case in point: Chevrolet announced on Wednesday that its Silverado HD would be getting a whole host of upgrades for the 2021 model year, in addition to a towing capacity bump up to 36,000 pounds.

Now, it would seem as though the bulk of these upgrades will affect the suspension and wheels, and that's how GM was able to find the additional 500 (unnecessary) pounds of towing capacity. The General isn't overly specific about what these changes were, exactly, but it is unambiguous on which model will be able to hit that new max towing figure.

Specifically, if you want to tow the equivalent of 15.65 ND-generation Mazda Miatas, you'll need to spec up to the Silverado 3500 HD Work Truck with a regular cab, dual-rear-wheels and two-wheel-drive, and equip it with the 6.6L Duramax diesel, 10-speed Allison transmission and Max Tow Package.

Speaking of towing, Chevrolet wants to make it as easy as possible, so it's got a towing-assistance system with eight cameras, providing 15 views. It's also got the same trailering tech that we saw (and appreciated) in the Silverado 1500, which means that it's got things like jack-knife alert, trailer-length indication and more.

Finally, the Silverado HD will be released in at least four special versions for 2021. These include the Midnight Edition, Z71 Sport and Z71 Chrome Sport editions as well as a Carhartt Special Edition that adds a bunch of Carhartt logos and a two-tone interior.

It's unfortunate that, even with all these changes and special editions, Chevrolet didn't fix the biggest problem with the Silverado HD, and by that, I, of course, mean that truly hideous face it's sporting. It is not only the king of towing, for the time being, it's also still the king of the ugly trucks.

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Volvo XC40 Recharge electric SUV only manages 208 miles of range, EPA says – Roadshow

Volvo XC40 Recharge

It's got looks and safety, but the Recharge's range leaves much to be desired.

Volvo

If like us, you were looking forward to the all-electric Volvo XC40 Recharge, then we have some unfortunate news for you, and it concerns the Recharge's EPA range estimate, which it announced on Tuesday.

What do we mean? Well, the EPA gave the Recharge a range estimate of just 208 miles. While that wouldn't be terrible on its own, it starts to look a bit grimmer when you consider that the Recharge is packing a fairly sizable battery -- 78 kilowatt-hours, to be precise -- and the same drivetrain as the Polestar 2. However, that model leaves something to be desired in the range department too.

Why is it so bad, though? Part of it has to do with the body shape of the XC40. It's less slippery than the Polestar 2 or Tesla's Model Y, for example, and wind resistance is a surefire way to eat up range. That shape difference would account for the approximately 11% worse range than the Polestar.

The rest of the story is a little bit murkier. Without having driven one, it's hard to say how close the EPA estimates are. As we did with Porsche's Taycan, we could see that the real-world range is much better than the estimate -- or we could see that the folks in Washington were right.

Even if things are better in practice than they are on paper, that 208-mile range figure might be enough on its own to cause customers to look elsewhere. Still, if the driving dynamics are as good as in the ICE-powered XC40, then maybe the extra expense of going to the Recharge over something like the Chevy Bolt would be worth it.

Volvo didn't immediately return Roadshow's request for comment.

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Ducati unveils adaptive cruise control, blind spot warning on Multistrada V4 – Roadshow

ducati-multistradav4-development-team-uc198153-high

The Ducati Multistrada V4 promises a technological terror that crushes continents for breakfast.

Ducati

We're just now getting to a point in the industry where cruise control on motorcycles is reasonably common. This is a byproduct of the move toward electronic or "ride-by-wire" throttles, and on a long road trip, it's a really nice way to avoid cramped wrists.

Of course, the next step would be to add adaptive cruise control and other advanced rider aids to bikes, but given motorcycles' relatively modest prices and the fact that they sell in far fewer numbers than cars, the expense was always too great to justify. Except now, Ducati has just announced on Tuesday that it's gone ahead and done it.

That's right, folks, the new Multistrada V4 will be the first production motorcycle to be offered with both front- and rear-facing radar. Not only will this enable adaptive cruise control, which would be sweet enough on its own, but the rear radar will allow blind-spot warnings. This is a huge deal too, since motorcycle mirrors often can't offer truly excellent rear visibility thanks to their size and limited placement options.

ducati-rear-radar-uc198005-high

The rear radar unit integrates cleanly with the Multistrada's taillight assembly.

Ducati

Beyond just the need for radar, the addition of adaptive cruise control to motorcycles necessitates some changes to how an adaptive cruise system might behave in a four-wheeled vehicle. The motorcycle system's tuning needs to be much more progressive, both in throttle and brake applications, in order not to cause a rider to lose control. This is made even more challenging with the naturally more sensitive controls that a bike -- especially a powerful bike like the Multistrada V4 is likely to be -- has.

This is a massive leap forward in tech for motorcycles, and hopefully it's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the kind of advanced safety systems and rider aids that can be brought to bear on these amazing machines. Making bikes safer means that they're more accessible, and as far as we're concerned, that's a very good thing.

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2021 Jaguar F-Pace and XF pricing to start at $51,145 and $45,145, respectively – Roadshow

2021 Jaguar F-Pace

It may not be wildly different than the previous model, but the 2021 F-Pace is still a looker.

Jaguar

As we've seen recently, Jaguar is thinning its herd a bit and discontinuing models that are either somewhat redundant in its lineup or that just plain aren't selling. The F-Pace SUV and XF sedan fall into neither of these categories and that's no bad thing. Both are nice to look at and drive, but will they uphold that proud Jag tradition of costing slightly less than you might think?

Of course they do and to prove that, the F-Pace starts at just $51,145 (including destination) for the P250 model with its 246-horsepower engine and all-wheel drive. Things go up from there, of course, with the top-tier P400 R-Dynamic S model, packing a mild-hybrid 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six that makes 395 horsepower starting at $66,350, also including destination.

Being a sedan, the XF is just a bit cheaper. The base P250 S model has the same 246-horsepower inline-four cylinder engine as the F-Pace, but the XF is offered in rear-wheel drive and starts at $45,145. The top trim P300 R-Dynamic SE shares its engine with the similarly-named F-Pace but, again, is rear-wheel drive and much cheaper. It will set you back just $51,145 before options.

The most significant change for both models for 2021 is the introduction of a new infotainment system called Pivi Pro, which made its debut in the brand new Land Rover Defender. We've experienced it in a production-spec Defender and while it's better than the outgoing system, it's not exactly on the level of Porsche PCM or Audi's MMI Touch.

We've got other stories that go more fully in-depth on what's changed for '21 on both models, so be sure to go and check them out.

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Cadillac CT5-V Blackwing to offer gorgeous optional carbon racing seats – Roadshow

2022-ct5-v-blackwing-seats

That kind of quality carbon work isn't something you typically see in an American car.

Cadillac

Cadillac has given us plenty to be excited about its forthcoming CT5-V Blackwing, despite it not actually coming with the awesome Blackwing V8 -- confusing, we know. Still, Caddy has some more exciting info in store for us in the form of a new seat option.

Specifically, we're talking about the gorgeous carbon-backed racing seats that will be optional on the 2021 Blackwing. The carbon itself will be bookmatched -- that is, the weave will line up on either side of the middle seam -- which is something you typically only see on very high-end supercars. It will also feature laser-etched V logos.

Cadillac promises other "customer-centric innovations and features" to come, but we're not exactly sure what that means. It looks like Caddy is scoring 10 out of 10 for vague marketing speak, so good work there, gang.

Still, there's plenty that's already more-or-less-confirmed to look forward to, like a manual transmission option and a top speed north of 200 miles per hour. Oh, and while we don't know officially what engine it'll have, we do know what it sounds like, and it's incredible.

Keep an eye out for more CT5-V Blackwing news as we get closer to the summer 2021 launch date.

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