Netflix to stream new Sony movies like Spider-Man, Jumanji starting in 2022 – CNET

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Netflix has struck a new deal with Sony Pictures Entertainment to stream all the studio's new movies starting with films theatrically released in 2022, the companies said Thursday, which includes popular franchises like Jumanji, the Spider-Man films linked narratively to Marvel's blockbusters and Morbius, a spinoff from that Spider-Man universe. The films will be available to stream in what's known as a pay-one window, after they've already finished their runs in cinemas and have been available for home viewing like online rentals. 

Spider-Man: No Way Home may be one of the last movies that'll be shown first on TV through Starz, which currently holds the pay-one-window rights to Sony movies. Starz will continue to be the first place on TV to watch any Sony movies released theatrically this year -- currently, that includes the third in the trilogy of films starring Tom Holland as the mild-mannered superhero. No Way Home is slated for theatrical release Dec. 17. Netflix takes over the rights from Starz starting Jan. 1.

Typically, movies licensed in a pay-one window would be available to watch on a streaming service or TV network about nine months after a film's theatrical release. But the last year has seen a dramatic collapse of these windows as the COVID-19 pandemic forced cinemas around the world to close, decimating the box office market for movies. Studios, distributors and theater chains are now in the throes of figuring how long cinemas will enjoy exclusives on new movies when public health restrictions finally open cinemas widely again. Agreements so far indicate movies will never be released the same way they were before the pandemic. 

Netflix and Sony didn't specify how long after theatrical release their pay-one window would start making movies available to stream. 

Netflix already had a deal to stream Sony Pictures Animation's films, including the sequel to Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse, so now Netflix will be the streaming hub for all Sony Pictures Entertainment film labels and genres, the companies said. The companies noted that the new deal means Netflix will be streaming "several more ... films featuring Marvel characters, including future installments of Venom and Spiderman; and expected follow-ups for the Jumanji and Bad Boys franchises." 

The new Netflix deal also includes a provision giving the streaming giant first shot at snapping up any movies Sony decides to make direct-to-streaming titles, in what's called a first-look agreement. But Sony said it won't be scaling back the number of movies it releases in cinemas; any direct-to-streaming projects will be additive to a "full theatrical film slate, which will continue at its current volume," the companies said.  

As part of the pact, Netflix will start streaming select titles from Sony's past movie library next year, the companies said without specifying any titles. 

Financial terms weren't disclosed. Bloomberg News previously reported Sony was seeking as much as $250 million a year; Variety reported Thursday that the new deal is believed to run about five years.

These sort of pay-one deals have been a staple of Hollywood for years, a lucrative way for studios to generate big bucks for their films. But as more major media companies launch their own streaming options to rival Netflix, these deals have become more rare. Disney, for example, allowed its pay-one mega deal with Netflix to elapse the year before it launched Disney Plus, reserving all its own films to make their streaming debuts on its own service instead. 

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YouTube shares how many times rule-breaking videos get viewed — sort of – CNET

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YouTube has more than 2 billion monthly visitors. 

Angela Lang/CNET

YouTube Tuesday began sharing new information about the impact of bad behavior on Google's massive video site: its violative view rate, or how many times rule-breaking videos get watched before YouTube takes them down. But the massive scale of YouTube's total viewing, which the company doesn't detail, means how much people are actually watching these misleading, dangerous, hateful or offensive videos is still tricky to gauge. 

YouTube's latest violative view rate shows that for every 10,000 views on YouTube, about 16 to 18 of those views were of videos that were later removed for violating YouTube's community guidelines. That's equivalent to 0.16% to 0.18% of YouTube's total views, a rate that has roughly held steady for the last year. And the data show YouTube's violative view rate has meaningfully come down from three years earlier, when it was 0.64% to 0.72%. 

YouTube's violative view rate, or how many views accumulate on rule-breaking videos before they're removed, has declined in the last three years. 

YouTube

But putting the new rate in the context is difficult because YouTube has never said how many total views its massive library of video gets, obscuring just how much people are actually watching these rule-breaking videos there. 

YouTube is the world's biggest online video resource, with more than 2 billion monthly users and more than 500 hours of video uploaded to it every minute. But even those figures are too general to draw conclusions -- and they're outdated. YouTube first crossed the 2 billion user mark two years ago and hasn't updated the figure since. The stat about 500 million hours hasn't been updated in at least three years. 

"We chose to actually report [violative viewing] as a percentage so you can get a sense of how meaningful [it is] overall to the platform," Jennifer O'Connor, a PM director of YouTube's trust and safety department, said Monday during a discussion of the new data with members of the press. 

YouTube -- like Facebook, Twitter, Reddit and many other internet companies that give users a platform to post their own content -- has grappled with how to balance freedom of expression with effective policing of the worst material posted on their platforms. Over the years, YouTube has reckoned with misinformationconspiracy theoriesdiscrimination, hate and harassmentvideos of mass murder and child abuse and exploitation, all at an unprecedented global scale. Critics of YouTube argue the company's content moderation efforts still fall short too often. 

"We don't catch everything," O'Connor said. "So we try to track what's the impact of that on our viewers." The violative view rate is one of the measures that guides YouTube's trust and safety team to understand how much rule-breaking videos are still getting watched, she said. 

The violative view rate measures individual views of videos that were later removed. Whether a user watched 30 seconds or 30 minutes of a violative video, that counts as one view. YouTube also counts a violative view if a user stopped watching the video before the violation actually occurred. 

YouTube didn't specify the kinds of policy violations that are getting seen before videos are removed. But O'Connor said that the breakdown is similar to the violation categories of removed videos, a measurement that YouTube already releases in its routine transparency reports

In the latest period, for example, videos violating YouTube's child-safety policies were the biggest violation type triggering a removal, at 41% of all removed videos in the last three months of 2020. That was followed by violent or graphic content at 20.6%, nudity or sexual content at 15.8% and spam or misleading content at 15.5%. Violation types like hate, harassment or violent extremism were all 1% of total removed videos or less. 

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Spotify revamps desktop, web app design — including downloads to your computer – CNET

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Spotify's desktop app was the company's first portal into its music service before mobile phone came to dominated, but Spotify said the desktop design hasn't kept up with changes over the years. 

Spotify

 Spotify has refreshed the look and feel of the desktop app and web player for its streaming music service, the company said Thursday, including the ability to download tracks to a computer with its desktop app for people who are paying premium members. 

It also made the design of its web player and desktop app more similar to its mobile app, so that using Spotify across platforms is more cohesive, Spotify said in a blog post. And Spotify simplified playlist creation and added more controls for web or desktop users, like the ability to write descriptions, upload images and drag and drop tracks into existing playlists. 

"We constantly test, develop, and launch new features," Spotify said. "Yet along the way, we felt that our desktop app experience hadn't kept up, and that it was time for a change."

Spotify also added new keyboard shortcuts to assist with many more tasks, the company said. Within the desktop app, PC users can press Control + ?, and Mac users, Command + ? -- that will bring up a full list of all commands available.

The news came about a month after Spotify held an event to reveal a list of announcements, including plans to launch a new subscription tier called HiFi for high-quality audio later this year and an expansion to more than 80 new countries. At the time, the streaming-music giant also unveiled podcast exclusives and a suite of new tools for artists and podcasters. 

Spotify is the biggest streaming music service by both listeners and subscribers in the world.

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Disney Plus to stream Black Widow on July 9, same day as theaters – CNET

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Marvel's Black Widow has been delayed multiple times as the pandemic has decimated theater-going. 

Marvel Entertainment/Screenshot by Joal Ryan for CNET

Disney on Tuesday delayed Marvel's Black Widow release yet again, this time until July 9 -- but Black Widow will also be available to stream that same day on Disney Plus for $30 through the service's Premier Access model, on top of what you pay for a regular Disney Plus subscription. 

Also Tuesday, Disney said: 

  • Its next Pixar film, Luca, will become a Disney Plus original film available to stream at no extra cost, essentially skipping theaters. 
  • Cruella, its live-action reboot of 101 Dalmatians, would also be available as a Premier Access release on Disney Plus the same day as theaters on May 28.
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, Marvel's next big-screen movie after Black Widow, was also delayed. Black Widow essentially took Shang-Chi's slot on July 9, and now Shang-Chi is set for release on Sept. 3. 

The Black Widow streaming move is Disney's biggest bet yet on its Premier Access model, even as optimism grows about audiences returning to cinemas over the coming months. 

Disney's theatrical release decisions are a meaningful signal about Hollywood's faith in the box office, but they also underscore the industry's willingness to keep offering wider choices for watching new movies even after the pandemic. Before the coronavirus restrictions decimated theater attendance, Disney racked up more top blockbusters than any other studio in the last five years, so its approach to theatrical releases is a bellwether for the industry.

Other Hollywood studios have shown signs of optimism about putting their big films back on the big screen, as vaccinations have accelerated in the US, one of the world's biggest movie markets. Several have moved up the release dates for tentpole films, underscoring anticipation that cinema attendance may bounce back sooner than they had previously hoped. In January, AT&T's Warner Bros. rescheduled Godzilla vs. Kong from May to March 31. Then in early March, Sony brought Peter Rabbit 2's release up to May 14 from June, and ViacomCBS' Paramount Pictures moved A Quiet Place II from September to May 28.

Just last week, Disney CEO Bob Chapek hinted that a streaming release for Black Widow may be possible, after the company had been silent for months about how and when Black Widow would be available to stream. At the time, Chapek emphasized that Disney was going to remain "flexible" about how it releases movies like Black Widow and warned that a decision would likely come "at the last minute."

Tuesday's Black Widow announcement also signals that Disney was impressed by the response to its last Premier Access release, its animated feature Raya and the Last Dragon. Raya came out on Disney Plus for an extra $30 fee alongside its March 5 theatrical release. But making Black Widow, part of Disney's powerhouse of Marvel blockbusters, a hybrid streaming-and-theatrical release suggests the company may be open to pursuing more Premier Access releases even after coronavirus restrictions on cinemas are relaxed. 

Until the pandemic, Disney had been loyal to the theatrical release norms that kept movies exclusively in cinemas for 75 days or longer. But as the COVID-19 pandemic continued to disrupt moviegoing, Disney evolved Disney Plus' role in its movie release cycle.

At first, Disney Plus simply started streaming already released movies months earlier than planned. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker began streaming three months early, as did Frozen 2 -- and Pixar's Onward landed on Disney Plus just weeks after it premiered in theaters. Then Disney started ratcheting up the streaming releases of new movies too, like the film version of award-winning musical Hamilton in July and Pixar's latest animated film, Soul, on Dec. 25. 

But Premier Access was Disney Plus' biggest change so far. Disney's live-action remake of Mulan in September was the first released under this model, followed by Raya earlier this month. These are moves that would've been unthinkable a year earlier, but long-held norms for releasing movies couldn't withstand the pandemic's extraordinary circumstances. 

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Marvel: Falcon and Winter Soldier is Disney Plus’ most watched series premiere – CNET

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The Falcon and the Winter Soldier is Disney Plus' second original show knitted closely into the storylines of Marvel's big-screen blockbusters.

Chuck Zlotnick/Marvel Studios

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier was Disney Plus' most-watched series premiere yet, Disney's Marvel said Monday, based on viewing from its premiere Friday through Sunday. Marvel didn't provide any hard numbers for the amount of viewing of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier's first episode generated.

The milestone is partly a function of the rapidly expanding subscriber base of Disney Plus. Popular series that debut recently are more likely to be watched by more people at their premieres than the shows that came before, when fewer people subscribed to the service. 

For example, The Mandalorian -- Disney Plus' breakout success -- had its series premiere the same day the service itself launched, when it was live in just the US, Canada and the Netherlands. Disney Plus' subscriber base was a fraction of the size then. Three months after The Mandalorian premiere, Disney Plus had less than 29 million subscribers. Earlier this month, Disney Plus crossed more than 100 million subscribers

Even WandaVision, another Marvel original series, premiered just 10 weeks ago on Jan. 15, but that was before Disney Plus launched more widely in Europe as a part Disney's latest streaming service, Star, in late February. 

Marvel noted that after The Falcon and the Winter Soldier's No. 1 ranking, WandaVision and the second season premiere of The Mandalorian (in October) had the next-most-watched opening weekends on Disney Plus among its original series. It didn't characterize which one had more viewership between the two. 

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Amazon locks up exclusive for NFL Thursday Night Football for a decade – CNET

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Angela Lang/CNET

Amazon Prime Video has locked up the national rights to the NFL's Thursday Night Football games, the biggest sports deal with a streaming service so far. Amazon's deal is part of a complex matrix of licensing arrangements the NFL unveiled Thursday. As a whole, the deals meaningfully broaden the online availability of many of the NFL's games while still largely keeping the league partnered with traditional media companies and their regular TV networks -- Amazon being the major exception. 

The deal marks a new stage in the evolution of TV to streaming. Amazon has been streaming NFL games for four years, but it's never negotiated and won exclusive rights to as many NFL games for this long. Online video has only grown in popularity during the coronavirus pandemic; last year the number of streaming video subscriptions worldwide topped 1 billion for the first time. Live sports -- and NFL games are the most-watched sports on TV in the US -- have been the main type of programming that traditional networks have counted on for reliable big audiences.

The NFL's new rights arrangements start in 2023 and last through 2033:

  • Amazon's deal with the NFL is the league's first all-digital partnership, making Amazon Prime Video the exclusive home of Thursday Night Football. Note that local, over-the-air broadcast networks will air Amazon's Thursday Night Football games in the cities of the participating teams. (In other words, if you want to watch your local team play on a Thursday night and you're not an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscriber, you'll still be able to watch either with a digital antenna or a regular pay-TV service like cable.) 
  • CBS will continue to air the American Football Conference's Sunday afternoon games, which will be broadcast on its namesake network and streamed live on its streaming service, Paramount Plus. 
  • Disney's ESPN will hold onto the rights for Monday Night Football, while the company's ABC broadcast network is taking on two Super Bowl broadcasts for the first time in years as well as some exclusive regular season games. This new deal with Disney gives ESPN Plus, the company's sports-focused streaming service, the right to simulcast all ABC and ESPN games. The deal with ESPN also includes a "bridge year" in 2022. (ESPN's Monday Night Football games will also be available on local broadcast stations in the participating teams' cities.)
  • Fox renewed its rights to the National Football Conference's Sunday afternoon games and expanded digital rights, which allow its free, ad-supported streaming service Tubi to deliver NFL programming. 
  • Comcast's NBC will continue to produce Sunday Night Football, and its streaming service Peacock will simulcast all Sunday Night Football games plus have an exclusive feed of a select number of NFL games over the decade-long term of the deal. NBC first acquired its package of prime-time games in 2006. 
  • The deals also divvy up the rights to a decade's worth of Super Bowls. CBS will have the big game in 2023, 2027 and 2031; Fox gets it in 2024, 2028 and 2032; NBC has the rights in 2025, 2029 and 2033; and ESPN and ABC get 2026 and 2030. 

Though people can subscribe to Amazon Prime Video directly, most of its viewing is believed to stem from members of Amazon's Prime program, which is best known for accelerated shipping of Amazon purchases. Prime Video is a bonus perk of a Prime membership, but even though Prime has more than 150 million members in the US, it's unclear how many of those actually watch Prime Video. By comparison, Netflix has more than 200 million members worldwide. 

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Disney hints Marvel’s Black Widow may come out online same time as theaters – CNET

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Marvel's Black Widow was delayed multiple times as the pandemic decimated theater-going. 

Marvel Entertainment/Screenshot by Joal Ryan for CNET

Disney CEO Bob Chapek hinted Wednesday that Marvel's Black Widow may be released online on Disney Plus the same time it hits theaters. Marvel's Black Widow is currently slated to open only in cinemas May 7, and until now Disney had consistently characterized that release as a theatrical exclusive. 

But Chapek said Wednesday that Disney would "remain flexible," after he was asked in an interview on Bloomberg whether the company is still committed both to Black Widow's May 7 release date and to its exclusivity in theaters. 

"We'll make the call ... probably at the last minute, in terms of how these films come to market, whether it's Black Widow or any other title," Chapek said. "We've had unbelievable success in theaters, so we think it's important to build our franchises -- but at the same time, we don't think it's the only way to do it."

The comments were the first inkling that Disney -- Hollywood's top box-office hit maker -- could adjust its theatrical release plans to include a streaming option even for Black Widow, part of its Marvel powerhouse of megahit movies. For most of its biggest new movies, like Black Widow and other Marvel films, Disney has been delaying their releases until these once-guaranteed blockbusters may have a more certain shot at becoming box-office behemoths. 

Even after Disney announced in December that its animated feature Raya and the Last Dragon would be released on Disney Plus for an extra $30 fee alongside its March theatrical release, the company was silent for months about whether Black Widow would be available in a similar way. Wednesday's comments suggested the potential for a hybrid streaming-and-theatrical release for Black Widow, even as optimism grows about COVID-19 vaccinations and cinema reopenings in the US. 

Disney's theatrical release decisions are a meaningful signal about Hollywood's faith in the box office, but they also underscore the industry's willingness to keep offering wider choices for watching new movies even after the pandemic. Before the coronavirus restrictions decimated theater attendance, Disney racked up more top blockbusters than any other studio in the last five years.  

Other Hollywood studios have shown signs of optimism about putting their big films back on the big screen, too, as vaccinations have accelerated in the US, one of the world's biggest movie markets. Several have moved up the release dates for tentpole films, underscoring anticipation that cinema attendance may bounce back sooner than they had previously hoped. In January, AT&T's Warner Bros. rescheduled Godzilla vs. Kong from May to March 31. Then in early March, Sony brought Peter Rabbit 2's release up to May 14 from June, and ViacomCBS' Paramount Pictures moved A Quiet Place II from September to May 28.

In the pandemic, Disney has already make dramatic changes to how it "windows" the online releases of its movies. As Disney first started to cope with coronavirus cinema shutdowns, the company simply started streaming already released movies on Disney Plus months earlier than planned and delayed all its new theatrical films. Frozen 2 began streaming three months early, in March 2020, as did Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, in May 2020, and Pixar's Onward hit Disney Plus just weeks after its theatrical premiere. 

Then Disney started switching some theatrical movies into Disney Plus streaming originals instead, essentially skipping theaters entirely. The company's live-action film version of the musical Hamilton arrived on Disney Plus this way in July, and Pixar's Soul did too in December. Upcoming films like Cruella, its live-action reimagination of 101 Dalmatians, will be a Disney Plus original film instead of a theatrical premiere as originally planned. 

The biggest change was Disney Plus' so-called Premier Access model. Premier Access requires subscribers to pay an extra $30 fee to unlock access to these big new movies, which are typically available to stream the same day that the film debuts in theaters. Disney first tested this in September with Mulan, the mega-budget remake of its 1998 animated classic, and it revived the model for its animated feature Raya and the Last Dragon in early March. 

Any early Black Widow release on Disney Plus is widely expected to be through the Premier Access model with the extra fee. 

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Why Yellowstone, Paramount’s biggest show, isn’t on Paramount Plus – CNET

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Kevin Costner stars in Yellowstone, which was the most-watched scripted show on cable TV last year.  

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Paramount Plus launched Thursday, replacing CBS All Access with a new name and a bigger library to stream. But missing from its widened selection is the single TV show most associated with the Paramount name right now: Yellowstone. The epic cowboy drama has been a breakaway hit for the Paramount Network, one of ViacomCBS' cable channels. 

Paramount Plus will have a new Yellowstone prequel to stream later this year, with another spinoff to come -- but if you want to binge Yellowstone itself, you need to mosey over to Paramount Plus' rival Peacock, which has the exclusive rights to stream the first three seasons. When Yellowstone returns after its cliffhanger finale -- an episode that drew in the biggest audience of any scripted TV show on cable last year -- you can expect season 4 will be on Peacock too.  

And Yellowstone isn't the only high-profile ViacomCBS program that's streaming elsewhere. If you're looking for Comedy Central's South Park, you need to check out HBO Max. Paramount Plus may be rebooting Nickelodeon teen sitcom iCarly, but if you're reliving the original right now, you're probably watching it on Netflix, the biggest subscription streaming competitor in the market. iCarly's first two season are among the most-watched programs on Netflix in the US right now. 

As confusing as it is, that's by design. Content licensing is a big business for ViacomCBS, and for the time being, ViacomCBS is betting that top-shelf programs can make more money -- and reach more eyeballs -- if they're off Paramount Plus rather than on it. 

These streaming-license deals are a lucrative business, one that's been growing in opportunity as a parade of deep-pocketed tech and media companies have been launching a flood of new services, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as the "streaming wars." Disney PlusHBO MaxApple TV PlusPeacockDiscovery Plus and now Paramount Plus are all taking on stalwarts like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, and they're all shoveling yet more money into programming they make themselves -- or license from others. Like all those that came before, Paramount Plus hopes its particular concoction of TV shows, movies and originals will hook you on its vision for TV's future. 

But byzantine licenses like ViacomCBS' underscore that even when a new service like Paramount Plus launches by rallying around its own content, it doesn't necessarily simplify how many services you must use to find and watch your favorite shows and movies online. 

Clawing back

Every new streaming service launching out of Hollywood makes its own judgment about how much, and what, to keep for itself. 

Disney, for example, has been firm in letting its big licensing deals run out, including a major deal with Netflix that streamed its theatrical movies for an estimated $200 million to $300 million a year over four years. With those blockbusters reserved for its own service, Disney Plus wanted to become a reliable hub for the back catalogs of all its major franchises. 

NBCUniversal, in addition to licensing Yellowstone for its Peacock service, won the rights to its own show The Office from Netflix at the beginning of this year so Peacock could stream the sitcom exclusively. And HBO Max clawed back the rights to all eight Harry Potter movies (temporarily) from NBCUniversal so they'd be available to stream when the Max at launch. 

But Paramount Plus hasn't been nearly as aggressive at keeping its top properties within its own fold or reclaiming ones it has licensed elsewhere. With titles like Yellowstone, South Park, iCarly and many others farmed out to others, Viacom CBS made nearly $6 billion from licensing last year, almost one-quarter of the company's total revenue. 

"It remains to be seen how much ViacomCBS is willing to risk its existing high-margin licensing business, especially with its current Showtime and key CBS programs already sold around the world," Robert Fishman, an analyst at MoffettNathanson, said in a note last week. 

ViacomCBS has said its strategy is "evolving" about how much of its own programming it should license to itself. When you grant your own programming to your own service, you forsake piles of money you could haul in if you'd licensed it to someone else instead. And ViacomCBS has a big back catalog to tap into: roughly 140,000 TV episodes and 4,000 films. 

But ViacomCBS doesn't want all that on Paramount Plus. 

"We can't keep all that for ourself. It doesn't make sense," ViacomCBS CEO Bob Bakish said in November. "It's too much."

So only a fraction of it is available on Paramount Plus, which is trumpeting 30,000 episodes and 2,500 movies. (And many of the movies on Paramount Plus won't be ViacomCBS' own; that influx of 2,500 films is part of a licensing arrangement ViacomCBS struck with Epix, bringing in movies from an array of studios.) 

However, beyond the money ViacomCBS makes by licensing, Paramount Plus also believes it may be able to draw in more new members if it lets other, bigger services have those top-tier titles to stream. Bakish has noted that other platforms can expand the audience for an older show so that its reboots and spinoffs have a bigger fan base for Paramount Plus. 

It's a perverse sort of logic, but Netflix has 200 million worldwide subscribers. Paramount Plus has fewer -- probably far fewer -- than 30 million. ViacomCBS is betting that renting iCarly to Netflix, where it's one of the most-watched titles right now, could pay off with more fans down the line who may turn to Paramount Plus for the series reboot. Interest in Avatar: The Last Airbender surged last year when the show hit Netflix -- certainly helping motivate ViacomCBS' decision last week to launch an entire new studio dedicated to fresh Avatar-related programming, much (but not all) of which will be on Paramount Plus. 

But Yellowstone didn't go to Peacock to reach more eyeballs. Peacock has only 22 million people signed up so far, and even fewer subscribed to its paid tier that unlocks access to Yellowstone. 

And so when that Yellowstone prequel Y:1883 arrives on Paramount Plus later this year, chronicling the Dutton family's arrival in Montana more than a century ago, the unacquainted will need to stream elsewhere to figure out who the Duttons even are. 

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Paramount Plus will cost $10 ad-free, $5 with ads on a ‘base’ tier launching in June – CNET

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Sarah Tew/CNET

Paramount Plus, a new streaming service replacing CBS All Access next week, will cost $10 a month to stream ad free on a premium tier and will add a cheaper, $5-a-month "base" tier in June that is supported by advertising. 

That cheaper tier marks a $1 discount to CBS All Access' entry-level price, but this base tier will no longer have the live stream of CBS' broadcast network, which CBS All Access does. CBS All Access currently costs $6 a month or $60 annually for its tier with advertising, or $10 a month or $100 annually to go ad-free. It's also offering a year of the service at half price, which will will carry over to Paramount Plus. 

The Paramount Plus premium tier will include the breadth of everything on Paramount Plus, including live streams of the CBS Network and local channels; though this is an ad-free tier, there will be advertising in the live channels. 

The base tier includes ads during the shows and movies you watch on demand, and it will limit how much programming you can watch. For example, a base tier subscriber will be able to watch NFL games but won't be able to see all of Paramount Plus' live sports. The base tier will have all Paramount Plus originals, but it won't be able to access every title in the catalog. 

The news was announced during an investor event on Wednesday, which was expected to unveil the scope of Paramount Plus and clarify key details about the streaming service, including cost and a flood of new programming that ViacomCBS hopes will draw in new subscribers, even as customers' choices in streaming have exploded in the last year and a half. 

Paramount Plus marks yet another new video service to roll out, like Disney PlusHBO MaxApple TV PlusPeacockDiscovery Plus and others that came before it. Like them, Paramount Plus hopes its particular concoction of TV shows, movies and originals will hook you on its vision for TV's future. But these so-called streaming wars also complicate how many services you use -- and pay for -- to watch your favorite shows and movies online. 

Paramount Plus's new pricing compares with Netflix's cheapest tier at $9 a month and its most popular plan is at $14. Apple TV Plus is $5 a month, Disney Plus is $7 a month (going to $8 next month), and HBO Max is $15 a month. All of those services are ad-free.

Among competitors that have ad-supported options, Hulu is $6 a month with ads and $12 a month ad-free. Peacock has a free, limited tier with ads, but you can pay to unlock its full catalog. Those paid, premium Peacock memberships are $5 a month with advertising, or you can upgrade to an ad-free version for $10 a month.

CBS All Access currently costs $6 a month or $60 annually for its tier with advertising, or $10 a month or $100 annually to go ad-free. It's also offering a deal to get a year of the service at half price, which will will carry over to Paramount Plus. 

Paramount Plus will launch in the US and Latin America on March 4.  

Check CNET's full coverage of the Paramount Plus event. 

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Paramount Plus to stream big-screen movies as soon as 5 weeks after theatrical debut – CNET

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Sarah Tew/CNET

Paramount Plus, a new streaming service replacing CBS All Access next week, will stream some new movies from Paramount Pictures 35 to 45 days after they premiere in theaters, while other Paramount flicks will hit the online service as soon as 90 days after they hit cinemas. 

The Paramount Pictures studio's slate this year includes movies like A Quiet Place Part II, Top Gun: Maverick and Mission: Impossible 7. But ViacomCBS, the company that runs both the Paramount studio and Paramount Plus, didn't specify which movies it will stream early, and the Paramount Plus release plan isn't as aggressive as some other streaming competitors have been at bringing theatrical films to streaming early.

Paramount Plus will also stream new movies from MGM Studios, home of the James Bond franchise, several months after they're released in theaters, in what's known as the pay-1 window. That's usually the time when new movies first come to pay-TV networks generally. 

The news was announced during an investor event on Wednesday, which was expected to unveil the scope of Paramount Plus and clarify key details about the streaming service, including cost and a flood of new programming that ViacomCBS hopes will draw in new subscribers, even as customers' choices in streaming have exploded in the last year and a half. 

Paramount Plus marks yet another new video service to roll out, like Disney PlusHBO MaxApple TV PlusPeacockDiscovery Plus and others that came before it. Like them, Paramount Plus hopes its particular concoction of TV shows, movies and originals will hook you on its vision for TV's future. But these so-called streaming wars also complicate how many services you use -- and pay for -- to watch your favorite shows and movies online. 

The move makes Paramount Plus the latest streaming service to upend conventions of movie releases during the coronavirus pandemic. In a move that shocked many and outraged some when it was announced in December, AT&T's WarnerMedia said all new movies from its Warner Bros. studio -- including Wonder Woman 1984Dune and The Matrix 4 -- would be available to stream on its own streaming service HBO Max the same day flicks hit theaters, at no added cost to subscribers. 

Even Disney, which has banked more top blockbusters in the years before the pandemic than any other studio, has experimented with releasing some of its big-screen movies on its Disney Plus streaming service the same day as they arrive in theaters. It tested a so-called Premiere Access model with its live-action remake of Mulan in September, putting it on Disney Plus with a $30 extra fee. Disney will revive the format next week when it releases its animated feature Raya and the Last Dragon in theaters and on Disney Plus with the extra cost at the same time. 

A year ago, moves like these would have been unthinkable. For decades, theatrical-release norms that kept movies exclusively in cinemas for 75 days or longer.

Paramount Plus will launch in the US and Latin America on March 4. Its predecessor, CBS All Access, currently costs $6 a month or $60 annually for its tier with advertising, or $10 a month or $100 annually to go ad-free. It's also offering a deal to get a year of the service at half-price, which will will carry over to Paramount Plus after March 4. 

Check CNET's full coverage of the Paramount Plus event. 

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