Check out the Rivian R1T in action at the Rebelle Rally – Roadshow

A few months ago, I drove the yet-to-be-released Rivian R1T electric pickup truck in the Rebelle Rally, an absolutely grueling, seven-day off-road adventure. The Rebelle is not won with speed, but rather with navigational accuracy, smart time management and excellent teamwork. It's a race I know quite well.

When my teammate Rebecca Donaghe and I had the idea to use Rivian's new truck, we had no idea how it would go. We didn't know how long the batteries would last, how long the truck would take to charge or even how we were going to charge it out in the middle of nowhere. We didn't know what the all-wheel-drive system could handle or if it could climb up rocky hills without locking differentials or solid axles. The whole thing was a giant experiment.

In the end, Rebecca and I ended up in sixth place in the 4x4 class, but we are hoping to return in 2021 and reclaim our place on the top of the podium, which we earned in 2018 in the 4x4 class in the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon and again in the crossover class in 2019 in the Rolls-Royce Cullinan

You can read my full review of the Rivian R1T here with all the juicy details about our range and how we charged the truck. But to really get a feel for the rally, check out the video above. The R1T is available this June, with the Rivian R1S SUV following in August. 

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2022 Nissan Frontier vs. Chevy, Ford, Honda, Jeep and Toyota trucks – Roadshow

The new Frontier looks pretty great.

Nissan

After 17 years of waiting, Nissan finally dropped the next-generation Frontier on Thursday. While the powertrain debuted last year, the Frontier's looks and technology are all new and, dare we say it, worth waiting for. Let's see how it compares to the current slate of midsize trucks, including the Chevy Colorado, Ford Ranger, Jeep Gladiator and Toyota Tacoma.

Before we begin, know that some sacrifices had to be made in the name of not drowning you in spreadsheets, dear reader. A majority of the figures compiled below represent trucks in crew cab configuration, probably the most popular trim. We also decided to stick to four-wheel drive models, since the majority of buyers opt for it. All the relevant specifications were taken directly from the automaker's website. The GMC Canyon doesn't appear here because it's essentially identical to the Chevy Colorado. No hard feelings, GMC.

Bodies and engines

The 2022 Frontier will be available as a Crew Cab with a short or long box and a King Cab with a long box. The Tacoma and Ranger offer two body styles, too. The Gladiator and Ridgeline only have one.

The Colorado is also the king of engine options, with two gas engines and one diesel powerplant on offer. The Gladiator also gets a diesel in addition to its standard gas engine. The Tacoma has two engine options, and I4 and I6, while the Ranger, Ridgeline and new Frontier are only available with one engine. 

Body styles and engines


Body styles Available engines
Chevy Colorado 3 2 gas, 1 diesel
Ford Ranger 2 1 gas
Honda Ridgeline 1 1 gas
Jeep Gladiator 1 1 gas, 1 diesel
Nissan Frontier 2 1 gas
Toyota Tacoma 2 2 gas

Off-road geometry

Unfortunately Nissan doesn't have any off-road geometry information available just yet. For the rest of the lot, we've broken off the hardcore variants of each model to show just how much more capable they are versus the more mall-crawler-friendly variants. The Gladiator is far and away the champion of this category, boasting an impressive 40.8-degree approach angle (43.4 on the Rubicon).

The Gladiator is also the king of ride height by a country mile, varying between 10 and 11.1 inches depending on spec. The Ridgeline is closest to the ground at 7.6 inches, but again, it rides on a car-based platform, so it's not nearly as trucky.

Off-Road Specs


Approach Departure Breakover Ground clearance
Chevy Colorado 17.6 deg 22.3 deg 19.7 deg 8.3 in
Chevy Colorado ZR2 30.0 deg 23.5 deg 23.5 deg 8.9 in
Ford Ranger 28.7 deg 25.4 deg 21.5 deg 8.9 in
Honda Ridgeline 20.4 deg 19.6 deg 19.6 deg 7.6 in
Jeep Gladiator 40.8 deg 25.0 deg 18.4 deg 10.0 in
Jeep Gladiator Rubicon 43.4 deg 26.0 deg 20.3 deg 11.1 in
Nissan Frontier TBD TBD TBD TBD
Toyota Tacoma 29.0 deg 23.0 deg 24.0 deg 9.4 in
Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro 35.0 deg 23.9 deg 26.0 deg 9.4 in

Towing and payload

For this one, we kept the towing and payload figures to gas-engine variants with four-wheel drive. Otherwise, the Colorado with its diesel engine would trounce everything on the list with 7,700 pounds of towing.

However, even with that leveled out field, the Frontier is still mid-pack. It's pretty good when it comes to payload, missing the Ford Ranger by just 40 pounds. It's not too far behind the Ranger in terms of towing either, but the Gladiator just kills everything in the class.

Towing and payload


Towing Payload
Chevy Colorado 7,000 pounds 1,532 pounds
Ford Ranger 7,500 pounds 1,650 pounds
Honda Ridgeline 5,000 pounds 1,583 pounds
Jeep Gladiator 7,650 pounds 1,600 pounds
Nissan Frontier 6,720 pounds 1,610 pounds
Toyota Tacoma 6,500 pounds 1,405 pounds

Interior volume

Nissan doesn't have the final interior measurements yet for the Frontier, so we've labeled it as TBD since we expect full interior measurements closer to its launch date. Chevrolet, for some reason, doesn't even offer a single overarching interior volume figure, so that's why the Colorado is NA on this table -- it's not like the interior exists outside traditional Euclidean space. Despite being the widest truck, the Ranger has the smallest crew cab interior volume of the measured group at 97.6 cubic feet. The Ridgeline is by far the roomiest, so score some points for the Honda.

Interior Space


Interior volume
Chevy Colorado NA
Ford Ranger 97.6 cubic feet
Honda Ridgeline 109.7 cubic feet
Jeep Gladiator 103.0 cubic feet
Nissan Frontier TBD
Toyota Tacoma 100.1 cubic feet

Size

For this one, we had to narrow the trucks down by selecting 4x4 crew cabs with the longest bed offered. With that rule in place, the Frontier sits firmly in the middle in terms of wheelbase and overall length, but it's the most narrow of the lot. It's also one of the tallest, towering over the Chevrolet Colorado by almost 2 inches.

Exterior Dimensions


Wheelbase Length Width Height
Chevy Colorado 140.5 in 224.9 in 74.3 in 70.5 in
Ford Ranger 126.8 in 210.8 in 77.8 in 71.5 in
Honda Ridgeline 125.2 in 210.2 in 78.6 in 70.8 in
Jeep Gladiator 137.3 in 218.0 in 73.8 in 73.1 in
Nissan Frontier 139.8 in 224.1 in 73.0 in 72.4 in
Toyota Tacoma 140.6 in 225.5 in 74.4 in 70.6 in

Talkin' tech

We could lay out all manner of specifications here, but we decided to stick with the figures that you can appreciate with just a quick glance. Here, we compare the largest and smallest screen sizes, whether or not advanced driver-assist systems are standard, and whether or not the truck can be outfitted with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The Frontier gained Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for its 2022 model year, but it doesn't have Nissan's Safety Shield 360 standard. The Colorado is a bit stingy with safety tech, but the Ranger, Ridgeline, Gladiator and Tacoma include it across the board. 

Tech features


Smallest screen Largest screen ADAS standard? Apple/Android
Chevy Colorado 7.0 in 8.0 in No Yes
Ford Ranger 4.2 in 8.0 in Yes Yes
Honda Ridgeline 8.0 in 8.0 in Yes Yes
Jeep Gladiator 7.0 in 8.4 in Yes Yes
Nissan Frontier 8.0 in 9.0 in No Yes
Toyota Tacoma 7.0 in 8.0 in Yes Yes

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2022 Nissan Frontier gets a fresh new look and a lot more tech – Roadshow

The new Frontier looks a whole lot better.

Nissan

After 17 years of faithful service, it's time to say goodbye to the old Nissan Frontier. Making its debut Thursday, the brand-new 2022 Frontier is a midsize pickup that should still appeal to folks who appreciated the old model's basic trucksportation while offering enough modern conveniences to satisfy all you techies.

First off, this truck looks great. Nissan looked to its Hardbody truck of the 1980s to give the new Frontier some personality and, we've got to say, it totally works. The new Frontier is a bit longer overall than the outgoing model, adding about 5 inches, most of which is ahead of the dashboard. Even so, the old Frontier's 126-inch wheelbase remains the same. We're totally here for the new front fascia with its blocky LED headlamps, and we like how the bumper cuts away to reveal more of the tires. The sculpted and dampened tailgate has a place to stamp "Frontier" into the sheetmetal, and the nameplate stretches across the width of the truck.

Now playing: Watch this: 2022 Nissan Frontier: What's old is finally new

5:11

The 2022 Frontier will be available in S, SV, Pro-4X and Pro-X trims -- more on that last one in a minute. Both Crew and King Cab body styles will be available with a choice of 5- and 6-foot bed lengths. Do note that the Pro-4X model is the one with the Lava Red accents, LED front lighting and black-painted grille. The rest of the Frontier lineup won't have such niceties.

Nissan launched the new Frontier's engine in the old truck, so we already know what we're in for here. The 2022 Frontier has a 3.8-liter V6 with 310 horsepower and 281 pound-feet of torque. Power gets to the ground through a nine-speed automatic transmission. And no, a manual transmission isn't offered.

Power-wise, the Frontier bests a lot of its key competitors. The Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon twins offer 308 hp and 275 lb-ft from their 3.6-liter V6, and the Toyota Tacoma makes do with 278 hp and 265 lb-ft from its 3.5-liter V6. The Ford Ranger's 2.3-liter turbo I4 has 270 hp, but it bests the other trucks with torque, offering a healthy 310 lb-ft.

The new Frontier has a maximum payload rating of 1,610 pounds and max tow rating of 6,720 pounds. That payload number beats the Chevrolet Colorado and Ford Ranger, but the Frontier can't compete with the two in terms of towing. The Tacoma has a few configurations that can both tow and haul more than the Nissan, but by and large the Frontier stacks up competitively within the class. Trailer sway control comes standard.

The Frontier should be a bit more pleasant to drive for 2022 thanks to new hydraulic cab mounts to the frame, which Nissan says reduces road vibration by 80% compared to the old truck. The Frontier has a larger front stabilizer bar and a new rear stabilizer bar for better handling, and the hydraulic-assist power steering ratio is increased by 16%. Overall, these look to be some tidy upgrades that should improve the Frontier's on-road manners.

As for off-roading, Nissan doesn't have full engineering specs yet, so we don't have key information like ground clearance or approach and departure angles. What we do know is that the Pro-4X will only be offered with four-wheel drive, Bilstein shocks, skid plates on the front, a two-speed transfer case and, of course, a rear locking differential. Hankook all-terrain 265/70-series tires wrap around 17-inch wheels. A new off-road mode in the 360-degree camera works at slow speeds while in four-wheel-drive low range to give drivers a view of rocks and other obstacles around them.

The Frontier's 3.8-liter V6 produces 310 horsepower.

Nissan

The aforementioned Pro-X trim, meanwhile, only comes with two-wheel drive. Nissan says this is for the customer that wants the rugged look of the Pro-4X but doesn't need the off-road capability. The Bilstein shocks and front skid plate are part of the package, but that's it.

Hill-start assist is standard on every Frontier and hill-descent control comes on all four-wheel-drive models. If you want to improve your rig, Nissan's Nismo division will offer a whole slew of parts for the 2022 Frontier, including suspension upgrades, lighting, step rails and rooftop racks and tents.

As for the interior, it seems about par for the class. As you'd expect, the new Frontier is leaps ahead of its predecessor, but the design still favors function over form. Sure, the Pro-4X has plenty of Lava Red accents, and that's nice and all, but don't expect anything luxurious. Honestly, though, the same can be said of pretty much any midsize truck. The car-based Honda Ridgeline is really the only one with a swanky cabin.

The interior isn't what we'd call swanky, but at least it has Nissan's newer infotainment tech.

Nissan

Storage, at least, is plentiful, with 4 liters of volume in the center console, 5.7 liters in the rear door pockets and 6.5 liters in the front door pockets. Plus, there's a little cubby on top of the dash and storage under the rear seats. Nissan's uber-comfy Zero Gravity seats are standard on all trims, too. The Pro-4X features an embossed pattern on the seats that reminds us of a Navajo blanket and honestly, we hope it doesn't carry over to the rest of the line up. It's just a little too much.

The Frontier finally gets with the times with a standard 8-inch touchscreen running the NissanConnect infotainment system supplemented by Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Drivers can opt for a larger 9-inch touchscreen, and wireless charging is available on the Pro-4X and Pro-X. As for other charging options, the front seats get one USB-A and one USB-C port along with two 12-volt outlets. The rear of the King Cab doesn't have any outlets, save for a 110-volt, 400-watt plug, but the Crew Cab has two additional USBs. There is a second outlet in the bed for powering tools, blenders, what have you.

Nissan's Safety Shield 360 suite offers an impressive amount of safety tech, with things like blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure warning, automatic emergency braking and rear cross-traffic alert with automatic rear braking. Thing is, it's all optional. A lot of these features are standard on the Honda Ridgeline, Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma. Adaptive cruise control is available on the Frontier, too, but's an extra add-on on top of the Safety Shield package.

The Frontier looks well-equipped to battle the Ford Ranger, Toyota Tacoma and other midsize trucks.

Nissan

If you're looking for Nissan's hands-on ProPilot traffic assist system, keep on looking. Nissan says its Frontier buyers aren't really interested in having the truck control the steering, throttle and braking in stop-and-go traffic, but it wouldn't matter anyway, since ProPilot requires electric power steering, which the Frontier doesn't have.

We're still waiting for official pricing and fuel economy data, but Nissan says the Frontier should average somewhere around 20 miles per gallon with two-wheel drive and 19 mpg with four-wheel drive, just like the current Frontier. We'll have the final MSRP details closer to when the Frontier hits dealers this summer.

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2022 Nissan Frontier and Pathfinder: Watch the live debut right here – Roadshow

On Thursday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m. ET/10:00 a.m. PT, Nissan will present a double-whammy debut, when both the 2022 Frontier pickup truck and 2022 Pathfinder crossover will greet the world.

The long-awaited Frontier replaces the old truck that's been on sale since 2005. The new truck's engine actually debuted in the 2020 Frontier and it's a peach, producing 310 horsepower and 281 pound-feet of torque, mated to a 9-speed automatic transmission. We expect the truck to get some nice technology upgrades, with a modern and more robust infotainment system. Driver's aids should see a huge bump as well and there might even be room for Nissan's ProPilot Assist.

As for the Pathfinder, it isn't quite so long in the tooth, but it's still in need of an update. The current, fourth-generation crossover has fallen way behind the smaller Nissan Rogue in sales and can't really compete with three-row SUVs from Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Subaru, Toyota and more.

Be sure to bookmark this page and join us on Feb. 4 to see all the new hotness as it makes its live online debut.

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2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L: Bigger, bolder, better – Roadshow

Trims include Laredo, Limited, Overland and Summit. It looks like Trailhawk and Trackhawk trims did not make the initial cut, but will hopefully stay on when the two-row version gets its revamp.

Read the article

Published:Caption:Photo:Jeep

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A brief history of the Jeep Grand Cherokee – Roadshow

Discuss: A brief history of the Jeep Grand Cherokee

Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic. We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. Discussion threads can be closed at any time at our discretion.

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2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee goes big with 3 rows of seats – Roadshow

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L

The three-row L is a foot longer than today's Grand Cherokee.

Jeep

After 10 long years, a brand-new Jeep Grand Cherokee made its debut Wednesday, and the big news is that it now offers a third row of seats. In fact, this three-row variant is technically a separate model, called the Grand Cherokee L. And while the L gives us a good idea of what to expect from the rest of the Grand Cherokee range, it's the only version Jeep is talking about for now. Information about the two-row models will be released later this year.

Now playing: Watch this: Jeep shows off the three-row 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee

8:22

Bigger and more refined

Naturally, the Grand Cherokee L is much bigger than the current, five-passenger Grand Cherokee. Its wheelbase is about 7 inches longer than the current SUV, and at 17 feet in overall length, it's a full foot longer than today's model.

The Grand Cherokee L needs all that extra space to accommodate its new third row, which can house two passengers. Those folks in the way-back will have 37.3 inches of headroom and 30.3 inches of legroom, which isn't too bad. Behind that bench, you'll find 17.2 cubic feet of cargo space, which expands to 46.9 cubes when the seats are folded flat. Drop the second row and the Grand Cherokee L can accommodate 84.6 cubic feet of cargo.

In terms of design, you'll notice a bit of old-school Wagoneer in this new Grand Cherokee. Sure, a proper Grand Wagoneer is returning soon, but Jeep is smart to bring a few design cues from its first full-size luxury SUV to this latest Grand Cherokee. The hood is longer than before and the seven-slat grille is angled ever so slightly forward, which highlights the new LED lights. We really like the floating roof design, which is achieved by adding a piece of trim along the A pillar that extends along the roofline, stretching all the way back to the LED taillights. A variety of wheel sizes will be available, with 21-inch rollers available as part of the swanky Summit Reserve package.

Lots of luxury, tons of tech

The Grand Cherokee's updated cabin is sleek and sophisticated, and includes ambient LED lighting, plenty of open-pore wood and nice leather and metal accents. Audiophiles will enjoy the available McIntosh sound system, and people who want to get comfy-cozy will appreciate the heated and ventilated first- and second-row seats. The front chairs even have massaging seat backs.

A 10.1-inch color touchscreen is home to Jeep's new Uconnect 5 infotainment system, with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Below that you'll find redundant climate controls and a wireless charging pad that can accommodate two phones at once. A finely cut, backlit, rotary gear selector finishes off the center console, flanked by push levers for the terrain management system and air suspension.

The driver is treated to a 10.2-inch reconfigurable digital gauge cluster. This screen can display 24 different menus, everything from driver assistance systems to the available night vision and traffic sign recognition tech. Speaking of safety tech, the Grand Cherokee L comes with a whole bunch of goodies, including blind-spot monitoring, lane-keeping assist, rear cross-traffic alert and a hands-on driving assistant that combines lane-centering functionality and adaptive cruise control. No, that last one isn't anything new, but Jeep says it paves the way for a more advanced, hands-off system that should arrive in 2022.

That's one fancy interior.

Jeep

Two all-too-familiar engines

Under the hood, you'll find the same 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 that's lived in the Grand Cherokee since 2011, making 290 horsepower and 257 pound-feet of torque. Also on hand is the familiar 5.7-liter V8 with 357 hp and 390 lb-ft. Both engines are mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission and the V8 features cylinder deactivation for improved fuel economy. Were you hoping Jeep would use one of Chrysler's new eTorque mild-hybrid options? Yeah, so were we.

When it comes to towing and payload, the 3.6-liter Grand Cherokee L can tow 6,200 pounds while the larger V8-powered Jeep can handle 1,000 pounds more. There's a fairly large range in overall payload, too, from 1,200 pounds in the four-wheel-drive Summit with the V8 to 1,410 pounds in a Limited with the V6.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L specifications


2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L V6 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L V8
Engine 3.6-liter V6 5.7-liter V8
Power 290 hp 357 hp
Torque 257 lb-ft 390 lb-ft
Transmission 8-speed auto 8-speed auto
Wheelbase 121.7 in 121.7 in
Length 204.9 in 204.9 in
Width 77.9 in 77.9 in
Height 71.5 in 71.5 in
Weight (base) 4,618 pounds 5,330 pounds
Ground clearance 8.5 in 8.5 in
Payload (max) 1,410 pounds 1,240 pounds
Towing (max) 6,200 pounds 7,200 pounds
Cargo capacity (max) 84.6 cu-ft 84.6 cu-ft

The L should be as happy in the woods as any other Grand Cherokee.

Jeep

Off-road modes and air suspension

Just like the engines, the Jeep's four-wheel-drive systems are the same as before. Quadra-Trac I features a single-speed transfer case and full-time four-wheel drive. Quadra-Trac II adds a low range and the ne-plus-ultra Quadra-Drive II improves things further with an electronic limited-slip differential. One new thing, however, is a front-axle disconnect, which puts the Grand Cherokee L in two-wheel drive if it senses all-wheel drive isn't needed. The Grand Cherokee L's terrain management system has modes for Auto, Sport, Rock, Snow and Mud/Sand, and adjusts parameters like power delivery, steering weight, suspension tune, transmission and throttle mapping and the traction and stability control systems.

The Quadra-Lift air suspension gets a bit of a boost for 2021 (pardon the pun), with a greater range of travel and quicker activation. So equipped, the Grand Cherokee L has an extra inch of suspension travel compared with the outgoing Jeep. The L's stock ride height is 8.5 inches, but the Jeep can hunker down in Aero mode for a better fuel economy, and Park mode lowers the SUV for easier entry and exit. Off-Road 1 raises the clearance up to 9.9 inches while Off-Road 2 stretches a little higher, to 10.2 inches.

When set in Off-Road 2, the Grand Cherokee L can ford 24 inches of water. This also helps the SUV achieve an approach angle of 30.1 degrees, a departure angle of 23.6 degrees and a breakover angle of 22.6 degrees. No, those aren't Wrangler numbers, but they're great for a three-row unibody crossover.

The shorter, five-passenger Grand Cherokee will be revealed later this year.

Jeep

Competition and future models

Speaking of three-row unibody crossovers, the Grand Cherokee L's competitors are kind of all over the place. The Land Rover Defender 110 and Discovery are the most obvious choices, but they're much smaller. You could theoretically consider the Toyota Land Cruiser, too, but it uses body-on-frame construction and it's more expensive; this one will better compete with the upcoming Grand Wagoneer. There are plenty of three-row SUVs on the market, like the Ford Explorer, Hyundai Palisade, Kia Telluride, Mazda CX-9, Subaru Ascent, Toyota Highlander, Volkswagen Atlas and so on, but none of those can match the Jeep's off-road capabilities. Not even close.

Now, you might be asking: Why introduce a three-row Grand Cherokee when the Grand Wagoneer will soon be available? The answer comes down to platform/size and price. The Grand Wagoneer is much larger and uses body-on-frame construction while the Grand Cherokee L is smaller and has a unibody design. There's definitely room for both, especially since customers are hungry for SUVs of all shapes and sizes. Pricing for both models is still TBD, but we do know a fully loaded Grand Wagoneer is expected to crest $100,000, while a Grand Cherokee L won't even come close to that.

Look for the 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L to arrive at dealers this spring. The two-row Grand Cherokee will debut later in 2021, and a plug-in hybrid 4xe version is coming. Hopefully the high-performance Trackhawk and off-road Trailhawk models will return, as well.

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Jeep Grand Cherokee history: How the SUV evolved over nearly 3 decades – Roadshow

Still looks good after all this time.

Jeep

A new Jeep Grand Cherokee is nigh, y'all. About to enter its fifth generation, the Grand Cherokee should continue to be a big seller for Jeep, with lots of luxury, tech and of course, off-road cred. But before the brand-new Grand Cherokee officially bows this week, let's take a look back at the SUV's past.

ZJ Grand Cherokee: A smashing debut

Like, literally smashing. As part of its 1992 Detroit Auto Show festivities, Jeep drove the then-new Grand Cherokee up the steps of Detroit's Cobo Hall and smashed through one of the convention center's plate glass windows in order to show how rough and tough its new SUV was. It's my second-favorite auto show introduction of all time.

Meant to be a more luxurious Cherokee, the first ZJ-gen Grand Cherokee came in Base, Laredo and Limited trims and was initially offered with a 4.0-liter straight-6 engine with 190 horsepower. Rear- or four-wheel drive options were available, as were five-speed manual and four-speed automatic transmissions.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee was the first SUV to be offered with a driver's side airbag (fancy!). Today, even our knees have airbags, but back then, a driver's side bag was a big deal. The Grand Cherokee also had novel-for-the-time technologies including anti-lock brakes, power door locks, power windows and even cruise control. The Limited trim stepped everything up a notch with gold exterior accents, leather seats, keyless entry and digitized climate controls.

For the initial 1993 model year, Jeep offered a Grand Wagoneer version of the Grand Cherokee. It had a 5.2-liter V8 with 235 hp and the older Wagoneer's iconic woodgrain paneling. The Grand Wagoneer nameplate is returning in the not-too-distant future, but as a separate vehicle, not just a fancy trim level.

Several new variants came online during the ZJ Grand Cherokee's lifecycle. The 1995 to 1997 model year Orvis Edition had a signature hunter green exterior with gold accents and a two-tone green-and-tan interior. The 1997-98 Grand Cherokee TSI was a slightly sportier take, with unique 16-inch wheels and a bumping stereo system that featured controls on the steering wheel. 1998 saw the introduction of the Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited, featuring a 5.9-liter V8 with 245 hp. The first stirrings of a Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, anyone?

The second-gen Grand Cherokee was quite handsome.

Jeep

WJ Grand Cherokee: More rugged, more refined

When the second-gen Grand Cherokee arrived in 1999, it only shared 127 parts with the first-gen model (that's not a lot in car terms). The base 4.0-liter I6 carried over, but the older V8s were canned, replaced with a 235-hp, 4.7-liter V8. A four-speed automatic transmission was standard with a five-speed auto arriving in 2001.

Jeep's four-wheel-drive tech got a big upgrade during this generation. The company's Quadra-Trac II system brought a two-speed transfer case, with 4-All, Neutral and 4-Lo settings, the first of which would only send power to the rear wheels, but could transfer torque to the front when wheel slippage was detected. A new Quadra-Drive system was also offered, which took everything great about Quadra-Trac and added front and rear limited-slip differentials, allowing for side-to-side torque vectoring, rather than just front to back.

Oh, and fun fact: Jeep's then-parent company, DaimlerChrysler, teamed up with Porsche to strengthen the Grand Cherokee's unibody frame. Called UniFrame, the upgraded construction added strength and rigidity to the Jeep's platform, resulting in reduced noise, vibration and harshness.

Inside, the WJ boasted more room for people and cargo, and the controls were placed in more ergonomically friendly locations. Heated seats were available, as was dual-zone climate control and even a 10-disc CD changer. In 2004, the WJ got a slight makeover with a new grille and round foglamps. At that time, drivers could also opt for an in-dash navigation system.

grand-cherokee

Ooh, you fancy.

Jeep

WK Grand Cherokee: More, more, more

The 2005 Grand Cherokee came with big changes, including an independent front suspension and five-link rear axle. A 3.7-liter V6 engine was standard, producing 215 hp, but buyers could also get 4.7-liter or 5.7-liter Hemi V8s, the latter of which pushed out a healthy 330 hp. All engines used five-speed automatic transmissions, and the upgraded Quadra-Drive II system gained electronically locking front and rear differentials, as well as traction control.

The third-gen Grand Cherokee was a lot longer than its predecessor. The rectangular headlamps were swapped out in favor of round units, and the D pillar was pushed forward, giving the Jeep a more rakish appearance. The 2005 model was initially only available in Laredo and Limited trims, but some pretty swank options joined the party, like a rear-seat DVD system, automatic headlights and eventually even Bluetooth connectivity.

In 2006, two new versions arrived. You might not remember the luxurious Overland, but you sure as heck remember the Grand Cherokee SRT8, stuffed with a snarling 6.1-liter Hemi V8 that offered 420 hp. With fat, sticky tires, Brembo brakes and Bilstein shocks, I remember driving one and thinking no SUV would ever be quicker than that. Jeep obviously proved me wrong there, and the company also offered a 3.0-liter diesel option beginning in 2007. The 5.7-liter Hemi V8 got an upgrade in 2009, as well.

WK2 Grand Cherokee: An important upgrade

When the WK2 Grand Cherokee launched in 2011, Jeep's parent company was going through hard times. In fact, Chrysler used the development of this new Grand Cherokee to prove that its future vehicles would be built to a new, higher standard.

The WK2 had fully independent suspension geometry and a new terrain management system was offered, with Auto, Sport, Snow, Rock and Sand/Mud modes. This was when the Grand Cherokee also introduced its Quadra-Lift air suspension, complementing the Quadra-Trac I, Quadra-Trac II and Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive systems.

A lot of the original WK Grand Cherokee's underpinnings are still used today. This SUV had one of the first applications of Chrysler's Pentastar 3.6-liter V6, though a 5.7-liter Hemi V8 was offered, too. The previous diesel and SRT8 options didn't initially make the cut with the 2011 Grand Cherokee, but they both eventually made a comeback.

When the SRT8 rejoined the lineup in 2012, it packed a new 6.4-liter Hemi V8 with 470 hp. As part of the 2014 model year refresh, the SRT dropped the 8 from its name, in order to coincide with Chrysler's short-lived standalone SRT brand. The refresh also introduced the 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V6, which didn't stick around very long, and the luxurious Overland Summit model dropped the first part of its name, and still lives on as the Summit.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk joined the lineup a couple years later, with unique air suspension tuning that allowed for 10 inches of ground clearance, and the Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive system gained Selec-Control, a sort of off-road cruise control. This Grand Cherokee also had skid plates and off-road tires wrapped around 18-inch wheels.

Jeep lost its mind for the 2018 model year and gave us the Trackhawk, with Chrysler's 6.2-liter supercharged Hellcat V8 under the hood. The 475-hp SRT was still offered, but come on, who's going to pass up the chance to own a 707-hp Jeep?

Today, the Grand Cherokee is available in Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, Summit, SRT and Trackhawk variants, and offers lots of great tech including blind-spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control and Chrysler's fantastic Uconnect infotainment system.

WL Grand Cherokee: The 2021 model is almost here

All that history leads us up to this week, when the fifth-gen Grand Cherokee will make its debut. The 2021 Grand Cherokee should be larger than the current model, with nicer materials inside and a big tech upgrade. Don't expect the big dual-screen setup from the new Grand Wagoneer, but a digital gauge cluster, rotary shift knob and a bunch of new active safety features are expected to be offered. V6 and V8 engines will likely carry over, and a variety of four-wheel-drive systems will no doubt be available.

After 10 years on the market, the current Jeep Grand Cherokee is definitely ready for an overhaul. I can't wait to see what's next.

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Jeep Grand Cherokee history: How the SUV evolved over nearly 3 decades – Roadshow

Still looks good after all this time.

Jeep

A new Jeep Grand Cherokee is here, y'all. About to enter its fifth generation, the Grand Cherokee should continue to be a big seller for Jeep, with lots of luxury, tech and of course, off-road cred. So alongside the debut of the brand-new Grand Cherokee this week, let's take a look back at the SUV's past.

ZJ Grand Cherokee: A smashing debut

Like, literally smashing. As part of its 1992 Detroit Auto Show festivities, Jeep drove the then-new Grand Cherokee up the steps of Detroit's Cobo Hall and smashed through one of the convention center's plate glass windows in order to show how rough and tough its new SUV was. It's my second-favorite auto show introduction of all time.

Meant to be a more luxurious Cherokee, the first ZJ-gen Grand Cherokee came in Base, Laredo and Limited trims and was initially offered with a 4.0-liter straight-6 engine with 190 horsepower. Rear- or four-wheel drive options were available, as were five-speed manual and four-speed automatic transmissions.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee was the first SUV to be offered with a driver's side airbag (fancy!). Today, even our knees have airbags, but back then, a driver's side bag was a big deal. The Grand Cherokee also had novel-for-the-time technologies including anti-lock brakes, power door locks, power windows and even cruise control. The Limited trim stepped everything up a notch with gold exterior accents, leather seats, keyless entry and digitized climate controls.

For the initial 1993 model year, Jeep offered a Grand Wagoneer version of the Grand Cherokee. It had a 5.2-liter V8 with 235 hp and the older Wagoneer's iconic woodgrain paneling. The Grand Wagoneer nameplate is returning in the not-too-distant future, but as a separate vehicle, not just a fancy trim level.

Several new variants came online during the ZJ Grand Cherokee's lifecycle. The 1995 to 1997 model year Orvis Edition had a signature hunter green exterior with gold accents and a two-tone green-and-tan interior. The 1997-98 Grand Cherokee TSI was a slightly sportier take, with unique 16-inch wheels and a bumping stereo system that featured controls on the steering wheel. 1998 saw the introduction of the Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited, featuring a 5.9-liter V8 with 245 hp. The first stirrings of a Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, anyone?

The second-gen Grand Cherokee was quite handsome.

Jeep

WJ Grand Cherokee: More rugged, more refined

When the second-gen Grand Cherokee arrived in 1999, it only shared 127 parts with the first-gen model (that's not a lot in car terms). The base 4.0-liter I6 carried over, but the older V8s were canned, replaced with a 235-hp, 4.7-liter V8. A four-speed automatic transmission was standard with a five-speed auto arriving in 2001.

Jeep's four-wheel-drive tech got a big upgrade during this generation. The company's Quadra-Trac II system brought a two-speed transfer case, with 4-All, Neutral and 4-Lo settings, the first of which would only send power to the rear wheels, but could transfer torque to the front when wheel slippage was detected. A new Quadra-Drive system was also offered, which took everything great about Quadra-Trac and added front and rear limited-slip differentials, allowing for side-to-side torque vectoring, rather than just front to back.

Oh, and fun fact: Jeep's then-parent company, DaimlerChrysler, teamed up with Porsche to strengthen the Grand Cherokee's unibody frame. Called UniFrame, the upgraded construction added strength and rigidity to the Jeep's platform, resulting in reduced noise, vibration and harshness.

Inside, the WJ boasted more room for people and cargo, and the controls were placed in more ergonomically friendly locations. Heated seats were available, as was dual-zone climate control and even a 10-disc CD changer. In 2004, the WJ got a slight makeover with a new grille and round foglamps. At that time, drivers could also opt for an in-dash navigation system.

grand-cherokee

Ooh, you fancy.

Jeep

WK Grand Cherokee: More, more, more

The 2005 Grand Cherokee came with big changes, including an independent front suspension and five-link rear axle. A 3.7-liter V6 engine was standard, producing 215 hp, but buyers could also get 4.7-liter or 5.7-liter Hemi V8s, the latter of which pushed out a healthy 330 hp. All engines used five-speed automatic transmissions, and the upgraded Quadra-Drive II system gained electronically locking front and rear differentials, as well as traction control.

The third-gen Grand Cherokee was a lot longer than its predecessor. The rectangular headlamps were swapped out in favor of round units, and the D pillar was pushed forward, giving the Jeep a more rakish appearance. The 2005 model was initially only available in Laredo and Limited trims, but some pretty swank options joined the party, like a rear-seat DVD system, automatic headlights and eventually even Bluetooth connectivity.

In 2006, two new versions arrived. You might not remember the luxurious Overland, but you sure as heck remember the Grand Cherokee SRT8, stuffed with a snarling 6.1-liter Hemi V8 that offered 420 hp. With fat, sticky tires, Brembo brakes and Bilstein shocks, I remember driving one and thinking no SUV would ever be quicker than that. Jeep obviously proved me wrong there, and the company also offered a 3.0-liter diesel option beginning in 2007. The 5.7-liter Hemi V8 got an upgrade in 2009, as well.

WK2 Grand Cherokee: An important upgrade

When the WK2 Grand Cherokee launched in 2011, Jeep's parent company was going through hard times. In fact, Chrysler used the development of this new Grand Cherokee to prove that its future vehicles would be built to a new, higher standard.

The WK2 had fully independent suspension geometry and a new terrain management system was offered, with Auto, Sport, Snow, Rock and Sand/Mud modes. This was when the Grand Cherokee also introduced its Quadra-Lift air suspension, complementing the Quadra-Trac I, Quadra-Trac II and Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive systems.

A lot of the original WK Grand Cherokee's underpinnings are still used today. This SUV had one of the first applications of Chrysler's Pentastar 3.6-liter V6, though a 5.7-liter Hemi V8 was offered, too. The previous diesel and SRT8 options didn't initially make the cut with the 2011 Grand Cherokee, but they both eventually made a comeback.

When the SRT8 rejoined the lineup in 2012, it packed a new 6.4-liter Hemi V8 with 470 hp. As part of the 2014 model year refresh, the SRT dropped the 8 from its name, in order to coincide with Chrysler's short-lived standalone SRT brand. The refresh also introduced the 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V6, which didn't stick around very long, and the luxurious Overland Summit model dropped the first part of its name, and still lives on as the Summit.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk joined the lineup a couple years later, with unique air suspension tuning that allowed for 10 inches of ground clearance, and the Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive system gained Selec-Control, a sort of off-road cruise control. This Grand Cherokee also had skid plates and off-road tires wrapped around 18-inch wheels.

Jeep lost its mind for the 2018 model year and gave us the Trackhawk, with Chrysler's 6.2-liter supercharged Hellcat V8 under the hood. The 475-hp SRT was still offered, but come on, who's going to pass up the chance to own a 707-hp Jeep?

Today, the Grand Cherokee is available in Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, Summit, SRT and Trackhawk variants, and offers lots of great tech including blind-spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control and Chrysler's fantastic Uconnect infotainment system.

WL Grand Cherokee: Now with 3 rows

The fifth-generation Grand Cherokee will technically be offered in two variants. The longer-wheelbase L is the model Jeep debuted first, and it brings a lot more functionality to Jeep's strong-selling SUV: a third row of seats.

Yes, the Grand Cherokee L is a full foot longer than the outgoing WK2 model and can accommodate two extra passengers in the way-back. This fully updated Grand Cherokee is far more stylish both inside and out and it comes packed with lots of new infotainment and driver-assistance technologies, including the Uconnect 5 multimedia system.

What hasn't changed is what's under the hood. The Grand Cherokee L comes standard with Jeep's 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 making 290 hp, but buyers can opt for a 5.7-liter V8 with 357 hp. Several four-wheel-drive systems are available, including the Quadra-Lift air suspension system, giving this big SUV impressive off-road geometry.

The five-passenger Grand Cherokee will debut later in 2021.

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Best tire pressure gauges in 2021 – Roadshow

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 11,000 car crashes each year are caused by tire failure. More specifically, it says that underinflated tires are a major cause of failure and that not only can properly inflated tires save your life, you may also see a 3.3% increase in fuel economy.

Most new cars come with a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) that will warn you if a tire drops below the recommended air pressure. However, if you've got an older car you're going to have to check if you have the correct tire pressures yourself using an air gauge. Remember, your car's tires are the only part of your car that actually touch the ground, so it serves you well to check them regularly.

I've assembled this handy list of Roadshow's favorite tire pressure gauges. These best tire pressure gauge recommendations are based on hands-on experience as well as user ratings at popular e-commerce sites. Keep reading afterward for some more details about the different types of tire pressure gauges and some helpful tips so you'll always be prepared when on the road.

Jaco

This Jaco tire air pressure gauge is small enough to fit in your pocket or glove box. It can read up to 60 psi in 1 psi increments and is calibrated to the American National Standards Institute standard to be accurate within 1.5%. Heavy-duty brass components are wrapped in a rubber protective guard and the 2-inch glow-in-the-dark dial gauge is easy to read. Readings will stay on the analog dial until the pressure reset button is pressed, so you can release it from the valve stem and have a better look. If you need to deflate a bit, just leave the gauge attached and hold down that same button to have it act as a bleed valve for a slow release of air. The brass chuck can swivel 360 degrees, making it easy to use at any angle.

Slime

I know, it looks cheap and tiny but I have had this digital gauge for nigh on five years and it has never let me down. It measures from 5 to 150 psi in .5 psi increments and also reads in kPa and bar. I like the backlit screen and the ergonomic shape. It is battery-powered, but with the automatic shut-off the battery seems to last forever -- mine is still going strong. Plus this digital pressure gauge is small enough to be stored everywhere. For the Rebelle Rally I keep one in my pocket, one in the driver's door cubby and one in my tool bag just in case I lose one. 

Milton

Ah, the classic Milton pencil air pressure gauge, made in the USA. This little guy can measure psi from 5 to 50 in 1-pound increments, or 40-350 kPa in 10-kPa increments. It's made of plated brass with a four-sided white nylon metering bar. There is a built-in deflator valve and a single-chuck head. The pressure-reading bar stays out until the user pushes it back in, so you can take the gauge off the valve stem for a better look at the numbers. Plus, it has a clip on it so you can put this stick gauge in your shirt pocket like the car nerd that you are.

ARB

Off-road folks will often want to let air out of their tires rapidly to gain more traction on the trail. This tire pressure gauge removes the valve core so you can quickly get back to having fun. Deflating 35-inch off-road tires down to 12 psi can take up to 20 minutes, but one Amazon reviewer says they accomplished the same task in six. The analog pressure gauge measures up to 60 psi in one psi increments and the brass/stainless deflator tool is corrosion resistant. Further, the bronze tube gauge itself is not affected by outside temperatures, humidity levels or altitude.

Exelair

If you have a dual rear tire setup like on a heavy-duty truck or RV, you'll need a tire pressure gauge with a dual-head swivel chuck. I like this Exelair by Milton unit for its long reach and the 360-degree swivel on the chuck. Plus, it has an LED flashlight built-in so you can actually see what you're doing when searching for that inner tire valve stem. This gauge reads from 5 to 100 psi as well as kPa and bar on a backlit LED screen. The digital gauge will automatically shut off after 30 seconds and it comes with two AAA batteries. 

AstroAI

You can use an air compressor to fill up your tires, and adding a tire gauge to the air hose means you won't have to disconnect the air to check the pressure. This gauge is a No. 1 bestseller on Amazon in air tool parts and accessories. I like this digital tire pressure gauge because it's compatible with ¼-inch and ½-inch compressor outputs, has a locking chuck and comes with extras like a valve core tool and four valve caps. This gauge can measure from 0 to 250 psi and can also give readings in bar, kPa and kg/cm ^2 and there is a bleeder valve to let air out to remedy overinflated tires. The backlit LCD screen turns itself off after 20 seconds of inactivity to save on battery life.

Accutire

This tire pressure gauge from Accutire gets the coveted Amazon Choice rating and does double duty as a tread depth gauge. Sure, you could just use the old penny trick, but this gauge can give you an exact tread depth from 0 to 19/32 inches and includes an easy to read green/yellow/red indicator so you know right away if your tires need replacing. The pressure gauge can read up to 99 psi and also takes readings in bar, kPa and kg/cm^2. It also features a large backlit LCD display and an auto-shut-off feature to save battery life.

Comparison of best tire pressure gauges


Tire Gauge Price Range Features
Best pencil tire pressure gauge Milton Single Chuck Head Pencil Tire Pressure Gauge $4 5 psi to 50 psi Can measure in kPa; built-in deflator valve; inexpensive.
Best analog tire pressure gauge JACO Elite Tire Pressure Gauge $18 0 psi to 60 psi Small; built-in delflator valve; swiveling brass chuck.
Best digital tire pressure gauge Slime Digital Sport Tire Pressure Gauge $13 5 psi to 150 psi Long lasting battery; ergonomic feel; can measure in kPa and bar.
Best tire deflator/tire pressure gauge combination ARB ARB505 Tire Pressure Gauge and E-Z Deflator Kit $41 0 psi to 60 psi Quickly deflates tires for off-roading; corrosion resistant.
Best dual chuck tire pressure gauge EXELAIR by Milton Digital Dual Head Tire Gauge with Extended Swivel Air Chuck $14 5 psi to 100 psi 360-degree swivel chuck; long reach; built-in LED flashlight.
Best tire pressure gauge for an air compressor AstroAI Digital Tire Inflator with Tire Pressure Gauge $26 0 psi to 250 psi Compatible with ¼-inch and ½-inch compressor outputs; locking chuck; back-lit LCD screen.
Best multifunctional tire pressure gauge Accutire Tire Pressure Gauge with Tread Depth Gauge $16 0 psi to 99 psi Comes with tire tread depth gauge; auto-shut off; back-lit LCD display.

A dual-chuck tire pressure gauge allows you to check the pressure on rear dually tires.

Milton

Why do you need a tire pressure gauge?

Properly inflated tires are absolutely essential for achieving optimal fuel economy and a smooth ride. Not enough air in the tires means that more energy is required to push those wheels around, resulting in poor fuel economy. However, inflate them too much and your ride quality suffers. It's also of note that improperly inflated tires could lead to a blowout, and nobody has time for that.

NHTSA recommends checking your tire pressure every month, even if your car has a tire pressure monitoring system. Many systems will not indicate a loss of pressure until it recognizes a severe loss of pressure and fallout of the acceptable pressure range. It says that tires can lose up to one psi each month, so it's important to monitor them on a regular basis for proper tire pressure. 

What is the recommended tire pressure for your car?

Usually the manufacturer's recommended tire pressure is listed in pounds per square inch (psi) on a sticker in the driver's side door jamb. Most of the time all four tires run the same psi, but if your car has larger tires in the back, those will naturally take more air. Remember that as your tires move, the air heats up and expands, so it's always best to check to see if they have the correct tire pressure first thing in the morning when they are cold.

Off-roaders looking to deflate their tires accurately should look at this gauge from ARB.

ARB

Type of tire pressure gauges

These days tire gauges take many different forms. Old-school car tire gauges are shaped like a pencil and have a metering shaft that pops out from the bottom, indicating air pressure. A pencil gauge can be a bit hard to read, as the numbers on the shaft are small and they aren't super-accurate but they are virtually indestructible and highly portable.

Dial gauges are usually small, featuring a face that is about two inches in diameter. Often the dial is backlit so you can easily read it at night. They may or may not feature a length of hose. Dial gauges are more accurate than pencil gauges, but they may not be happy being bounced around in a glove box.

Digital gauges are the most accurate and very easy to read. Most will display air pressure in psi, kPa (kilopascal) or bar (barometric or 100 kPa). Once the tire gauge is pressed on to the valve stem, the gauge can read the pressure in two or three seconds. Digital gauges rely on batteries, so you'll have to keep an eye on power levels.

If you already have an air compressor at home, you can get a separate tire pressure gauge for it.

AstroAI

More on-the-go car care items

In addition to a tire pressure gauge, you should also carry a few emergency items with you at all times. Roadshow recommends carrying a portable jump starter and a first-aid kit at the very least, but it's also a good idea to keep a portable air compressor in your trunk. With all that, you'll never need to call AAA again.

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