Appeals Court Cuts Apple’s Patent Award Against Samsung

A U.S. appeals court on Monday sent a portion of a $930 million verdict Apple had won against Samsung back to a lower court, while letting stand part of the judgment issued in 2012. The court upheld a lower court jury decision that found Samsung had infringed on Apple's utility patents, but ordered reconsideration of a $382 million award for "trade dress dilution."

As the court defined it, "trade dress is the totality of elements in which a product or service is packaged or presented. . . . The essential purpose of a trade dress is the same as that of a trademarked word: to identify the source of the product."

In her ruling today in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, Judge Lucy Koh affirmed the lower court verdict awarding Apple $548 million in damages from Samsung for violation of two utility patent claims. However, she reversed the lower court's finding that "the asserted trade dresses are protectable."

From More than 50 Cases to Two

The current case between Apple and Samsung is one of two remaining after the companies were involved in more than 50 cases around the world. The legal wrangling began in 2011, four years after Apple released its first iPhone.

Just days prior to the January 2007 launch of the iPhone, Apple had filed for four patents that applied to the device's shape and design. Later that same year, it filed for a color design patent that applied to the phone's graphical user interfaces.

Apple initially filed suit against Samsung in the U.S. in April 2011, accusing its South Korea-based rival of copying the look and feel of its iPhones and iPads. Samsung eventually countersued Apple in courts in South Korea, Japan, Germany, the U.K. and the U.S.

Having since dropped most of...

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Appeals Court Cuts Apple’s Patent Award Against Samsung

A U.S. appeals court on Monday sent a portion of a $930 million verdict Apple had won against Samsung back to a lower court, while letting stand part of the judgment issued in 2012. The court upheld a lower court jury decision that found Samsung had infringed on Apple's utility patents, but ordered reconsideration of a $382 million award for "trade dress dilution."

As the court defined it, "trade dress is the totality of elements in which a product or service is packaged or presented. . . . The essential purpose of a trade dress is the same as that of a trademarked word: to identify the source of the product."

In her ruling today in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, Judge Lucy Koh affirmed the lower court verdict awarding Apple $548 million in damages from Samsung for violation of two utility patent claims. However, she reversed the lower court's finding that "the asserted trade dresses are protectable."

From More than 50 Cases to Two

The current case between Apple and Samsung is one of two remaining after the companies were involved in more than 50 cases around the world. The legal wrangling began in 2011, four years after Apple released its first iPhone.

Just days prior to the January 2007 launch of the iPhone, Apple had filed for four patents that applied to the device's shape and design. Later that same year, it filed for a color design patent that applied to the phone's graphical user interfaces.

Apple initially filed suit against Samsung in the U.S. in April 2011, accusing its South Korea-based rival of copying the look and feel of its iPhones and iPads. Samsung eventually countersued Apple in courts in South Korea, Japan, Germany, the U.K. and the U.S.

Having since dropped most of...

Comments are closed.