Anonymous Hackers Cop Plea to PayPal DDoS Attack

They arenEUt so anonymous anymore. Thirteen defendants pled guilty in federal court in San Jose to charges related to their involvement in the cyber-attack of PayPalEUs Web site as part of the group Anonymous. One of the defendants also pled guilty to the charges arising from a separate cyberattack on the Web site of Santa Cruz County.

The defendants admitted to carrying out a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) cyberattack against PayPal in December 2010. The hackers used software tools that work to damage a computer networkEUs ability to function by flooding it with useless commands and information, thus, denying service to legitimate users.

A group calling itself Anonymous claimed responsibility for the attacks, saying they conducted the cyber hit in protest of the companiesEU and organizationsEU actions. Anonymous made the software tools available as a free download on the Internet. The victims included major U.S. companies across several industries.

The Wikileaks-PayPal Scandal

HereEUs the backstory: In late November 2010 WikiLeaks released a large number of classified U.S. State Department cables on its Web site. Citing violations of the PayPal terms of service, and in response to WikiLeaksEU release of the classified cables, PayPal suspended WikiLeaksEU accounts such that WikiLeaks could no longer receive donations via PayPal. WikiLeaksEU Web site declared that PayPalEUs action EUtried to economically strangle WikiLeaks.EU

The plea agreements reveal that, in retribution for PayPalEUs termination of WikiLeaksEU donation account, Anonymous coordinated and executed DDoS attacks against PayPalEUs computer. Anonymous referred to these coordinated attacks on PayPal as EUOperation Avenge Assange," named for Julian Assange, editor-in-chief and founder of WikiLeaks.

Ten of the 13 Anonymous hackers pled guilty to felony charges and will be able to have those charges reduced to misdemeanors next year, if they don't violate their agreements with the government, according to the U.S. attorney's office. The other three...

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Anonymous Hackers Cop Plea to PayPal DDoS Attack

They arenEUt so anonymous anymore. Thirteen defendants pled guilty in federal court in San Jose to charges related to their involvement in the cyber-attack of PayPalEUs Web site as part of the group Anonymous. One of the defendants also pled guilty to the charges arising from a separate cyberattack on the Web site of Santa Cruz County.

The defendants admitted to carrying out a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) cyberattack against PayPal in December 2010. The hackers used software tools that work to damage a computer networkEUs ability to function by flooding it with useless commands and information, thus, denying service to legitimate users.

A group calling itself Anonymous claimed responsibility for the attacks, saying they conducted the cyber hit in protest of the companiesEU and organizationsEU actions. Anonymous made the software tools available as a free download on the Internet. The victims included major U.S. companies across several industries.

The Wikileaks-PayPal Scandal

HereEUs the backstory: In late November 2010 WikiLeaks released a large number of classified U.S. State Department cables on its Web site. Citing violations of the PayPal terms of service, and in response to WikiLeaksEU release of the classified cables, PayPal suspended WikiLeaksEU accounts such that WikiLeaks could no longer receive donations via PayPal. WikiLeaksEU Web site declared that PayPalEUs action EUtried to economically strangle WikiLeaks.EU

The plea agreements reveal that, in retribution for PayPalEUs termination of WikiLeaksEU donation account, Anonymous coordinated and executed DDoS attacks against PayPalEUs computer. Anonymous referred to these coordinated attacks on PayPal as EUOperation Avenge Assange," named for Julian Assange, editor-in-chief and founder of WikiLeaks.

Ten of the 13 Anonymous hackers pled guilty to felony charges and will be able to have those charges reduced to misdemeanors next year, if they don't violate their agreements with the government, according to the U.S. attorney's office. The other three...

Comments are closed.