2016 Cybercrime and Worst Hacks: Year in Review

It has already been a record-setting year for hacking scandals, and the headlines show no signs of slowing as we reach the end of 2016. Today?EU?s hack of Netflix?EU?s Twitter account by hacking collective OurMine is only the latest development in a year that has seen digital security become an issue of national security and election year politics.

According to CNET, OurMine, "a self-described white hat security group," said it was just testing Netflix' security. The group suggested Netflix contact it to find out more about the hack. OurMine tweeted its message, along with an email address and logo, to the nearly 2.5 million Twitter followers of @netflix, Netflix' U.S. account, this morning. "At least two more hacked tweets were sent. All of them have since been deleted, presumably by the Netflix social media team," according to CNET.

That message, along with an OurMine email address and logo, was tweeted out to the nearly 2.5 million Twitter followers of @netflix -- the Netflix US account -- on Wednesday morning. At least two more hacked tweets were sent. All of them have since been deleted, presumably by the Netflix social media team.

In previous years, most network intrusions have targeted enterprises and large corporations. But this year we saw a much more diverse field of victims, ranging from celebrities, technology CEOs, political parties, and even the Olympics.

More Political Hacks

Perhaps one of the most disturbing trends in 2016 has been the increased use of hacking to achieve geopolitical goals. Hacking groups linked to either the Kremlin or Russian president Vladimir Putin have been accused of reverting to Cold War tactics to weaken and delegitimize countries seen as political rivals.

A hack of the World Anti-Doping Agency?EU?s database, resulting in the publication of private medical records for several U.S. athletes, was attributed to a...

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